Should dogs be allowed in pubs? This Nova Scotian brewer thinks do

Ian Lawson, co-owner of Brightwood Brewery: ‘We believe dogs are family members’

People stand with their dogs in front of Brightwood Market in Dartmouth, N.S. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Ian Lawson)

A Halifax craft brewer has launched a petition to bring pooches into his pub, saying the province’s regulations are too unfriendly to dogs.

Ian Lawson, co-owner of Brightwood Brewery, says an anonymous complaint led a provincial inspector to order an end to his practice of allowing patrons to bring dogs into his establishment.

The 34-year-old entrepreneur said in an interview that dogs are valued companions who should be welcome in the taproom, provided they are friendly and under control.

“We believe dogs are family members,” he said in an interview on Monday. “It’s part of the craft brewing culture to be able to sit down and have a pint with your dog.”

Lawson adds he accepts regulations requiring that animals be kept away from food preparation areas for health and safety reasons.

However, his petition is calling on the province’s Environment Department to rewrite regulations that ban animals — other than service animals and aquarium fish — from the entire restaurant premises.

In the case of his pub, food preparation is limited to reheating meat pies and samosas — and the dogs were required to stay out of the area where the dishes were prepared.

Nova Scotia regulations clearly state, ”An operator must not permit any live animal to be in a food establishment,” with the exception of ”a guide animal, if permitting the guide animal to enter does not pose a risk of contaminating the food.”

The craft brewer said he’d like to see the rules changed to give inspectors latitude to decide on a case-by-case basis whether the presence of dogs poses any risk to food safety.

He cites legislation in B.C., which allows exemptions for “any other animal that a health officer determines will not pose a risk of a health hazard occurring on the premises.”

Meribeth Burton, a spokeswoman for the Health Department in B.C., wrote in an email: ”Our legislation does allow for animals in food establishments. However, it is not commonplace in British Columbia.” She said it is ultimately up to health authorities and their inspection teams to make a judgment call.

READ MORE: Boy’s service dog bounced from B.C. trampoline park

A spokesperson for the Nova Scotia Envirnoment Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Lawson said dogs had caused no problems since he opened in October 2018, other than a single incident of a dog that was barking and snarling. The owner was asked to leave after he refused to put the dog on a leash.

Since the inspector’s visit two weeks ago, the brew pub has been turning dogs away, fearing the loss of its wider operating licence if it doesn’t comply.

Lawson estimated about 30 people and their dogs have been told they can’t come in since the inspector’s visit, adding that he misses seeing them.

“It brought everyone joy being able to see a happy dog, and give the dog a pat on the head,” he said. “The good possibilities outweigh the bad.”

His petition on change.org had attracted more than 2,000 signatures Monday afternoon.

Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Walnut Grove Gators move up at basketball tourney

The Gators won their first game Thursday

Let’s Play BC hosted a games night for younger children to encourage physical fitness

Let’s Play BC and local wheelchair sports boosters are helping kids in… Continue reading

VIDEO: These are the top toys this Christmas, Langley toy experts say

Consider the play value of a game, staff at Toy Traders say

Christmas shoppers welcome at Langley’s Critter Care wildlife centre

The centre gift shop has items with photos of animals that have been care for at the shelter

Wildlife groups express concern animal-trap-related injuries are on the rise

Langley’s Critter Care Wildlife Society had nine cases in 2017, 15 in 2018, and 21 this year

VIDEO: Feds give update on flying clearance for Santa’s sled

Transport Minister Marc Garneau has this message for the country’s children

Investigators confirm three died in B.C. plane crash

Transport Canada provides information bulletin

Prime Minister sets 2025 timeline for plan to remove fish farms from B.C. waters

Foes heartened by plan to transition aquaculture found in Fisheries minister mandate letter

Planning price tag for futuristic ‘We Town’ concept in Abbotsford revealed

Developer says highrises would house 30,000, but Abbotsford mayor says project is in wrong place

Canada’s Attorney General looking to larger reforms on doctor-assisted death

The Quebec Superior Court gave Ottawa just six months — until March 2020 — to amend the law

Man accused of child sex crimes out on bail: Delta police

Gurchetan Singh Samra, 69, must stay away from — and not communicate with — anyone under 16 years old

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

1,300-signature petition for free menstrual products turned over to UFV president

‘Go with the flow’ campaign calls for all University of the Fraser Valley bathrooms to be stocked

Wagon wheels can now be any size: B.C. community scraps 52 obsolete bylaws

They include an old bylaw regulating public morals

Most Read