Theodore is a friendly pig, according to LAPS.

Theodore is a friendly pig, according to LAPS.

Many offers of home for lost Langley pig

LAPS is fielding offers of a home from the Lower Mainland to PEI for Theodore.

A Langley pig is closer to having a permanent home after dozens of offers to adopt the porker have rolled in to the Langley Animal Protection Society in recent days.

Theodore was found running at large in Langley Township, and was picked up by LAPS.

Since his story went public last week, more than a few people have offered to adopt him.

“We’ve had huge interest, lots of offers of homes,” said Jayne Nelson, LAPS’s executive director.

Offers have come from the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, and as far afield as Alberta, PEI, and Ohio.

LAPS is now reviewing the many offers and looking for a suitable forever home for the pig, who is destined for a life as a pet, not as livestock.

Experts consulted by the shelter suggested that end for Theodore, who has already been neutered, which will make him more amicable around other animals, including any pigs he might live with.

Anyone taking him on will need to pay a hefty grocery bill.

“He eats a lot,” said Nelson. “He eats about 30 pounds of food a day.”

Theodore particularly likes produce, bread, and oatmeal, and he seems to have a taste for roasted vegetables over raw ones.

The pig seems well suited for his future life as a pet.

“He’s really affectionate, he’s really quite social,” said Nelson.

READ MORE: An 800-pound pig needs a forever home

This is not the first time LAPS has had to wrangle a large farm animal.

Because of the many farms around Langley, the animal control officers have had to help round up everything from baby goats to llamas, horses to peacocks.

However, it’s rare for LAPS to have to find a new home for livestock, which is usually picked up by its owners quickly due to the value of the animals.

The Patti Dale Animal Shelter in Aldergrove is only set up for ordinary domestic animals like dogs and cats, so livestock have to be fostered with locals.

“We count on some great members of the community who are very generous,” said Nelson.