Appraiser Kevin Hansen cut a cheque for $2,000 to a man who brought a gold watch to the Great Canadian Roadshow on Wednesday, April 11. The event  attracted hundreds to the Coast Hotel and Convention Centre last week.

Appraiser Kevin Hansen cut a cheque for $2,000 to a man who brought a gold watch to the Great Canadian Roadshow on Wednesday, April 11. The event attracted hundreds to the Coast Hotel and Convention Centre last week.

Roadshow offers chance to cash in

The Great Canadian Roadshow set up shop at the Coast Hotel and Convention Centre in Langley City last week

Hundreds of people from across the Lower Mainland collected up their old trinkets from their attics in the hopes of scoring big at an antiques appraisal event in Langley City last week.

The Great Canadian Roadshow set up shop at the Coast Hotel and Convention Centre April 10-14 where appraisers wrote cheques — some worth thousands of dollars — to patrons who brought in valuable collector’s items.

“We buy all kinds of stuff from gold, silver coins, war memorabilia (to) musical instruments,” show manager David Gachie said.

“There’s a wide variety of stuff we’re looking for.”

He said most people brought coins to the Langley event, but he’s also seen war memorabilia such as bayonets pass through.

“What we’re looking for is really rare coins like the 1948 silver dollar or the 1921 nickel,” Gatchie said, adding those items can fetch anywhere from $13,000 to $30,000 depending on their condition.

The Great Canadian Roadshow works for a group of about 6,000 collectors who authorize a team of professional appraisers to purchase valuable items.

Appraisers review a computerized database to see if any of the collectors want the items people bring in.

Appraiser Kevin Hansen said one individual who brought a gold watch last Wednesday was able to leave with $2,000.

Although coins tend to go for the highest prices, he said war memorabilia — such as SS daggers or Iron Crosses — are usually the most interesting items he comes across.

Colton Berrard brought in a coin he found washed up on the Fraser River last year. Although the coin wasn’t listed in the collector database, Hansen encouraged him to mail it to a specialized coin appraiser to get it authenticated.

“Honestly, I don’t care what it’s worth. It’s more about sentimental value than anything,” Berrard said before adding he would be willing to sell it if the price was right.

Berthe Greenwood and her son Lawrence Greenwood were able to pocket some cash with a collection of coins that have been sitting in their home since the mid-1970s.

“We brought quite a lot of stuff in and found out some of it is not worth anything and some of it is of some value,” Berthe said.

She and her son walked out of the event with a cheque for $200.

Lawrence said the extra cash will be nice to have, but he mostly came just to see if the coins were worth anything.

“More than anything, we found out some of it is just spending money.

“Why hang onto it if it’s just spending money?” he said.

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