Jessica Horst, a volunteer with the Bertrand Creek Enhancement Society, picked Scotch Broom at Jackman Wetlands on Wednesday night. (Lisa Dreves/Special to The Star)

Jessica Horst, a volunteer with the Bertrand Creek Enhancement Society, picked Scotch Broom at Jackman Wetlands on Wednesday night. (Lisa Dreves/Special to The Star)

Scotch broom removal a big task six years in the making at Jackman Wetlands

Volunteers filled a truck-full of invasive shrub growing rampant in Aldergrove park

Jackman Wetlands Park is a little less filled with Scotch broom thanks to Lisa Dreves and Jessica Horst.

Dreves, Langley Environmental Partners Society (LEPS) stewardship coordinator, said a pick open to interested volunteers was held on Wednesday night to clear out some of the invasive shrub.

“There were only two of us out there, but we were able to fill the truck in an hour, no problem! We got about halfway down the walk into Jackman Wetlands Park,” Dreves noted.

She said the broom that was there has grown up in the last six years when it was last removed by the Bertrand Creek Enhancement Society.

“There were some broom with trunks over two inches in diameter,” Dreves exclaimed.

The Bertrand Creek Enhancement Society and LEPS are both working on tackling the Scotch broom at that particular area in the Jackman Wetlands Park this year.

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Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) is an invasive plant from western Europe – commonly found in old field habitats that are important to raptors around Aldergrove. It is easily recognizable by it’s bright yellow flowers.

“Broom reduces hunting grounds for raptors,” Dreves explained. “It is also allelopathic so nothing tends to grow under the broom so it severely impacts biodiversity where it becomes established impacting our bees and butterflies. Scotch broom is also considered a fire hazard.”

Horst, a volunteer with the Bertrand Creek Enhancement Society, said she was happy to volunteer to get out in the fresh air, work out the muscles, and take a break from work as she is a teacher and working overtime on report cards.

People can find more information about invasive species removals and other initiatives at www.leps.bc.ca or www.bertrandcreek.ca.


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