A sellout crowd of 500 people attended the Thanks for Caring – A Christmas Tea Fundraiser in Langley. (Black Press photo)

A sellout crowd of 500 people attended the Thanks for Caring – A Christmas Tea Fundraiser in Langley. (Black Press photo)

Thanks for Caring tea spotlights Christmas bureau work in community

The annual tea started in 2012 and was sold out in October.

The Thank You for Caring, a Christmas Tea Fundraiser (formerly known as the Mayors’ Wives Tea) was sold out before most people’s thoughts had even turned to ways to support the Langley Christmas Bureau.

Tickets went on sale in October and were sold out in October.

The tea has remained popular each year as people enjoy an afternoon of entertainment and refreshments in the name of helping the volunteer-run Christmas bureau.

“What I love is the awareness that it brings to the community of the need and the help that lots of families need,” said Debbie Froese, one of the organizers and wife of Township Mayor Jack Froese

Those lucky enough to get tickets will not only enjoy goodies but also entertainment by the Langley Ukulele Ensemble (the tribute act mentioned in the print edition is not performing). People will get to enjoy the Langley Community Music School perform chamber music at the start of the event.

There are games such as the $10 Christmas cracker raffle and silent auction items that include remote control toys, a motorized child’s Jeep, a signed Bo Horvat jersey, and more.

Expect to see many of those attending dolled up in their finery, including wearing fascinators.

The first mayor’s wives tea back in 2012 attracted about 240 people at a venue in Fort Langley.

“We knew we needed a bigger venue,” Froese said.

Since then the event has been held at the Cascades Casino Resort which provides a lot of support to make it successful, she added. Other sponsors also help cover overhead so more is raised for the bureau.

The larger venue means about 500 people can attend, but Froese is cautious about going bigger on the event, despite the popularity because of the amount of working needed for planning and the loss of some of the holiday magic that the event generates.