A block of yellow cedar, estimated at more than 516 years old, was transformed by renowned carver Xwalacktun (born Rick Harry), a member of the Squamish Nation, and a group of community youth into a beautiful piece of First Nations art. The group was working on the lawn of the Langley Centennial Museum on Monday and Tuesday to etch in the images of an eagle, a bear, a wolf and the Earth. At almost two metres tall, a carving of this size can take anywhere from three to five weeks to complete, depending on the design complexity. Once it is done, this piece will represent “feeling grateful for all the things we have received,” Harry said. A final location for the carving has yet to be determined.

A block of yellow cedar, estimated at more than 516 years old, was transformed by renowned carver Xwalacktun (born Rick Harry), a member of the Squamish Nation, and a group of community youth into a beautiful piece of First Nations art. The group was working on the lawn of the Langley Centennial Museum on Monday and Tuesday to etch in the images of an eagle, a bear, a wolf and the Earth. At almost two metres tall, a carving of this size can take anywhere from three to five weeks to complete, depending on the design complexity. Once it is done, this piece will represent “feeling grateful for all the things we have received,” Harry said. A final location for the carving has yet to be determined.

Photo: Many hands make light work

Carver Xwalacktun and a group of community youth chiseled away at a 500-year-old block of yellow cedar at the Langley Centennial Museum