TWU presents The Comedy of Errors—and gives it a twist by setting it in the disco era of the 1970s. (Jef Gibbons photo)

TWU presents The Comedy of Errors—and gives it a twist by setting it in the disco era of the 1970s. (Jef Gibbons photo)

TWU presents Bard in bellbottoms on Langley campus stage

While some Trinity students are on stage, others are displaying their talents at a Fort gallery.

The crowd-pleasing farce of twins and mistaken identity gets the 1970s treatment in Trinity Western’s production of William Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors.

Never before has this much polyester graced the stage of Freedom Hall at TWU’s Langley campus, said director Kerri Norris, TWU’s theatre instructor.

Though the actors will be speaking their best Shakespeare from the stage, the action takes place in the disco era of the ’70s, Norris said.

“I was looking for a period that could support the farcical elements I wanted to pull out of the play. With its whole Saturday Night Fever feeling, the disco era seemed the perfect fit.”

The Comedy of Errors plays March 13 to 24. For info and tickets, visit www.twu.ca/theatre.

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TWU duo bring show to gallery

A pair of Trinity Western University art students have a show opening today at Fort Gallery.

Field Notes is an honours exhibition.

It is an exploration of place, unearthing stories buried under everyday life, said co-creators Rachel Voth and Sarah Wright.

“Through maps of lived experiences, these works weave narratives into cloudscapes and urban dystopias, reminiscent of the places that inspired them,” they shared.

The duo ask how the space people inhabit has been influenced by personal histories, connecting and exploring these ideas through 2D and 3D forms.

The show opens Thursday, March 8, and continues until April 1, with an opening reception tonight [Thursday] at 7 p.m.

The gallery is open Wednesdays to Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. at 9048 Glover Rd. For more information, people can visit fortgallery.ca.

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A pair of TWU students open their art show at the Fort Gallery this Thursday, March 8, with an artists reception tarting at 7 p.m.

A pair of TWU students open their art show at the Fort Gallery this Thursday, March 8, with an artists reception tarting at 7 p.m.

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