Kitty Liu is the founder and director of the West Coast Youth Music Society. Courtesy Kitty Liu

Langley teen directs youth music society

Fifteen-year-old Kitty Liu founded the West Coast Youth Music Society to share her love of music.

A Langley teen keeps busy by doing ordinary teenage things—studying for class and practising her favourite instrument.

But Kitty Liu, a 15-year-old who attends R.E. Mountain Secondary, has taken on a bit more responsibility than the average high school student.

Liu is the founder and director of a non-profit organization called the West Coast Youth Music Society (WCYMS).

“I wanted to spread the joy of music to other people, so that’s why I started this organization,” said Liu.

Liu founded the society in October 2017 after she first performed at a seniors centre.

“I still remember the joy that lit up on the seniors’ faces after hearing us play and that was when I realized how simple it was to bring happiness to others through music.”

The WCYMS is a non-profit group that is open to young musicians age six to 17 who want to perform at public facilities across the Lower Mainland.

Liu co-ordinates concert dates with various community organizations, such as seniors centres. Members of the WCYMS can sign up for the shows they are interested in performing.

The WCYMS has performed at various locations throughout Greater Vancouver, including the Langley Senior Village.

The WCYMS has grown from 10 members in 2017, to approximately 80 performers today.

Liu is always looking for new musicians.

“We are constantly recruiting more people. Not only is this a good opportunity to spread music to other people, but it’s also a good opportunity for the kids in the organization to have performance opportunities. It aids their music learning when they are able to play for other people.”

Anyone who takes music lessons and wants to perform can join the WCYMS.

Each concert usually consists of 15 performers, who are allotted one or two pieces to play.

Liu started playing piano when she was eight years old. It took her only four years to finish the Royal Conservatory of Music’s highest level of exams.

“It became one of my favourite things ever. Even now, whenever I feel stressed or anxious I always turn to music and it helps me a lot. I like how you’re able to really express your emotions and connect to the audience through music. Music is a universal language so you can connect with so many people via performing and playing.”

Signing up for a performance is a good way to motive yourself to practise, according to Liu.

“Whenever there’s a performance coming up, people are generally more motivated to practise because there’s the pressure of bringing your music to others and you want to let others enjoy your music more. Playing on stage and practising at home are different because once you’re on stage, more people are listening so you’re more mindful of each note and how you play it.”

And for those who may suffer stage fright, Liu offers some advice.

“Treat this as a learning opportunity rather than something that’s really scary. Treat it as a chance to express your music and to learn. It’s OK if you make mistakes. Everyone has a first time and everyone makes mistakes once in a while. Just focus on your music instead of thinking how other people judge you.”

For more information or to join the WCYMS, Liu can be contacted through her website at https://wcymusicsociety.wixsite.com/website

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID claims 23rd Langley Lodge patient, making it the deadliest outbreak in B.C.

Coronavirus kills another senior at Langley care home, bringing B.C. total to 166

Family of dead Abbotsford football star urge changes to mental health policies in hospitals

Uko family disappointed in actions of Regina hospital, hosting public funeral service this weekend

Langley daughter recalls last words spoken to mother who died of COVID-19 on 88th birthday

Verna Clarke was more than a senior with dementia who died of COVID at Langley Lodge, she was ‘loved’

Langley grads mark a milestone amid a pandemic

Many local schools are finding ways to celebrate Grade 12 students

VIDEO: Workout Wednesday with Brand Fitness

In week nine Marion Brand shares a TRX workout

If Trudeau won’t stand up to Trump, how will regular people: Singh

Trudeau did not directly answer a question about Trump’s actions amid protests

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Thanks for helping the Langley Advance Times to continue its mission to provide trusted local news

22 new COVID-19 test-positives, one death following days of low case counts in B.C.

Health officials urged British Columbians to ‘stand together while staying apart’

John Horgan says COVID-19 restrictions won’t be eased regionally

B.C. Liberals urge ‘tailored’ response based on infections

Feds get failing grade for lack of action plan on anniversary of MMIWG report

‘Instead of a National Action Plan, we have been left with a Lack-of-Action Plan’

Maple Ridge woman fights WorkSafe BC over police widow’s pension

Dalila Vroom says husband, Const. Rob Vroom, died as a result of PTSD from time with Abbotsford PD

B.C. ranchers, lodge operators say Indigenous land title shuts them out

Tsilhqot’in jurisdiction affects grazing, access to private property

Sex offender Danny Depew sentenced in Abbotsford to 2.5 more years

Depew still has child-luring charges before the courts in Ontario

As two B.C. offices see outbreaks, Dr. Henry warns tests don’t replace other measures

Physical distancing, PPE and sanitizing remain key to reduce COVID-19 spread

Most Read