Bear eats grass next to Highway 3 in Manning Park, in video shot by a tourist. Drivers are subject to fines for unsafe stopping on highways.

‘Bear jams’ on B.C. highways bad for people, animals [with video]

Conservation officers have 300 bear conflict calls so far this month, with roadside bear viewing, feeding among problems

Bears are emerging from hibernation around B.C. as another strong tourist season begins, causing collections of often unwary onlookers and creating danger.

Hungry black bears come to roadsides in early spring to eat new grass, and can quickly attract a crowd.

“They cause what’s known as bear jams, where people stop to photograph the bears, look at the bears or feed the bears,” said Chris Doyle, deputy chief of provincial operations for the B.C. Conservation Officer Service.

“The problem with that is that it causes the bears to be habituated to people. It also does cause bears to get hit by vehicles on the highways, because if they are getting fed, they’re going to be attracted to those cars and they may dart out onto the highway quickly.”

Conservation Officers have fielded 300 calls about bear conflicts since April 1. Doyle said the problem is mainly in southwestern B.C. now and will pick up farther north in coming weeks.

A perennial hotspot for bear conflicts is along the North Shore and up the lower Fraser River, extending from North Vancouver to Maple Ridge where housing development abuts with mountain terrain.

Doyle said proper garbage management and use of bear-proof containers will help minimize contact.

With camping season starting, Doyle stressed the need to keep garbage secure.

“Those can be dangerous situations when you have a bear wandering around a campground.”

Here’s a typical tourist video, from someone police hope is parked in a safe spot:

Just Posted

Trappers on brink of elimination after third loss

“We’ve got to play desperate hockey’ coach of Langley hockey team says

Arrest in alleged parking lot assault at LMH

Langley RCMP investigating daylight incident

Langley author recounts service in the French Foreign Legion

Langley’s Joel Struthers aims to educate the public on what service looks like in the Legion.

From broad principles to specifics: City Nexus plan enters new phase

‘Transformational’ plan required to ready for arrival of rapid transit, CAO says

High school photo exhibit celebrates Aldergrove’s community

ACSS photography students showcased their work at Langley Arts Council’s grand opening last week.

B.C. resident baffled about welcome mat theft

Security footage shows a woman and her dog taking the mat from the property on March 13

Father thanks B.C. Mountie for shooting hoops with kids, ‘changing perspectives’

‘We’re just like everyone else,’ says Surrey officer who stopped to play basketball with kids

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Trans Mountain court hearing: B.C. says it won’t reject pipelines without cause

Canada says the proposed amendments to B.C.’s Environmental Management Act must be struck down

Carfentanil found in 15% of overdose deaths in January: B.C. coroner

Carfentanil is 100 times more powerful than illicit fentanyl and used to tranquilize elephants

B.C. father fights for his life after flu turns into paralyzing condition

Reisig has lost all motor skills with the exception of slight head, shoulder and face movements.

B.C. wildfire prevention budget bulked up as dry spring unfolds

Night vision goggles tested for early detection effort

Vernon ordered to reinstate terminated firefighters caught having sex at work

City believes arbitration board erred, exploring options

Most Read