Striving to set new standards for dining, the skilled chefs at NY’s Indian Grill in Langley serve taste sensations rooted in India but infused with Canada’s multicultural culinary traditions.

Community comes together over a flavourful fusion of taste and culture

‘There is no sincerer love than the love for food.”

Executive Chef Pardeep Mroke and his team at NY’s Indian Grill haven taken George Bernard Shaw’s comment to heart as they craft every experience at their Langley restaurant.

“Our passion is creating modern dishes from the best ingredients, bringing together our community’s people and cultures over delicious, healthy food,” says Pardeep, joined in the kitchen by Chef Vick Lahard.

Striving to set new standards for dining, skilled chefs led by Chef Pardeep serve taste sensations rooted in India but infused with Canada’s multicultural culinary traditions. The result is an extensive menu of appetizers, salads, mains and desserts, satisfying vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike. There’s even a wonderful selection of gluten-free options!

Chef Pardeep’s desire to create unforgettable food inspired NY’s Indian Grill. Born and raised in India, his experience at one of the India’s finest hotels, The Taj, awakened him to the possibilities of his love for good food. In Spain, he further polished his culinary skills with new practices from the region’s finest chefs, adding new dimensions to his cooking and piquing his interest in culinary fusion.

Taste the Healthy Side of Indian Cuisine

While misconceptions prevail about the healthiness of Indian food, its extravagance of taste, texture and aroma are good for mind and body.

Why?

“Indian food uses a wide array of fresh ingredients. In fact, most Indian meals contain at least four different fruits and vegetables typically cooked just enough that they retain their nutrients and texture. We like the quote that ‘Indian food is the best way to eat your greens and enjoy them too!’” Pardeep says.

Cooked-from-scratch cuisine like that at NY’s Indian Grill also yields dishes containing few or no preservatives – better for your body.

Many staples of Indian cooking, such as ginger, turmeric and chilies, are recognized for their healing and medicinal properties, while garam masala, another well-known compound of Indian spices is used to ward off flu symptoms and colds.

Most desi – or traditional – Indian dishes are well-rounded, balanced meals containing carbs, proteins and fibre, and with cooking options including grilling, boiling or pan frying, the myth of Indian food as oily is just that: a myth, Pardeep says.

And yes, research even suggests Indian cuisine boosts your brain’s “feel-good” hormone, seratonin, so your tastebuds aren’t the only thing you’ll make happy with that vindaloo!

Coming together over great food

As a hub of people of different cultures, the Lower Mainland has seen some exciting trends in culinary fusion.

Chicken tikka sandwiches on ciabatta are the perfect desi-Canadian mash-up enjoyed by all. And at NY’s Indian Grill, Vegetable Manchurian is a fulfilling Indo-Chinese dish of mixed vegetables serviced in a spicy sauce.

“At its heart, fusion cuisine – and NY’s Indian Grill – is about bringing people and cultures together to connect over food,” Chef Pardeep says.

Learn more or reserve your table at nyindiangrill.com, or visit 20204 Fraser Hwy.

 

Cooking from scratch at NY’s Indian Grill yields dishes full of flavour and fresh ingredients, and few or no preservatives.

Fresh, good-for-you ingredients, including lots of vegetables and fruits, are staples of the culinary creations at NY’s Indian Grill in Langley.

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