How hearing can affect your mental health

Self care means taking time for your needs, including consulting professionals for support

“Losing your hearing can be incredibly isolating, and significantly affect your mental health,” says Kim Galick, owner of Ears Hearing Clinic in Langley.

“Losing your hearing can be incredibly isolating, and significantly affect your mental health,” says Kim Galick, owner of Ears Hearing Clinic in Langley.

If you’re struggling with recent hearing loss, the challenges go far beyond your physical health.

“Losing your hearing can be incredibly isolating, and significantly affect your mental health,” says Kim Galick, owner of Ears Hearing Clinic in Langley.

If it’s tiring and frustrating to connect with the world around you due to hearing loss, you may avoid activities you used to enjoy. And it’s possible that the brain skills you don’t use, you lose. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

When people talk about self care, they often think about bubble baths, candles and weekend getaways. But prioritizing your health and putting your needs first is also effective self care. Consulting with an expert to gain a better understanding of your health concerns can boost your mood just as much as a bowl of ice cream.

The many connections between mental and physical health

Temporary and permanent tinnitus is defined as a phantom ringing in the ears. It’s common in musicians and people in the military, who typically experience noise-induced hearing loss. But that’s not the only cause for tinnitus.

“High levels of stress cause your body to go into fight or flight mode, which is an instinctual reaction that fills your body with adrenaline to help you escape danger. It also increases blood flow, including to the ears,” Galick says.

Taking time to do things that improve your physical and mental well-being are important acts of self-care. Prioritizing your health can have ripple effects throughout your life — managing stress may help resolve tinnitus; speaking to a professional may give you a boost — even if you don’t immediately solve every problem.

Even small, daily acts of self-care can help you manage stress, lower risk of illness and increase your energy.

“If you notice a loved one withdrawing from a family gathering, ask if there’s anything you can do to help. If they’re finding it hard to keep up with conversation, offer to sit next to them and repeat anything they might miss. If they’re feeling overwhelmed, offer to go for a walk one-on-one,” Kim says.

For a free hearing consultation, call Kim Galick at Ears Hearing Clinic, 604-427-2828 or email info@earslangley.com. Find Ears Hearing at Unit C 20568 56 Ave. in Langley, online at earslangley.com and on Facebook.

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Kim Galick at Ears Hearing in Langley.

Kim Galick at Ears Hearing in Langley.