FortisBC is committed to helping customers reduce their energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions and improve the comfort of their homes.

Planning some projects for your pad?

Investing in energy-efficiency upgrades could qualify you for rebates and bonuses

Renovating your kitchen or installing new hardwood flooring will definitely make your home look nicer, but if you’re planning on staying in your home long term, a dollar return on your investment is unlikely. But that’s not the case with energy-efficiency upgrades and improvements!

Investing in a new high-efficiency air source heat pump or increasing your attic insulation are major upgrades, but not only will they reduce your home’s energy costs year-after-year, you may also be eligible for rebates through FortisBC’s Home Renovation Rebate Program* and CleanBC Home Efficiency Rebates. And if you make two or more eligible energy-efficiency upgrades within 18 months of each other, you’ll also get FortisBC’s $300 two-upgrade bonus. That’s on top of your rebates!

Here’s how it works. Let’s say this winter you replace your old electric furnace with a new high-efficiency, variable speed, central air source heat pump and FortisBC gives you a $2,000 rebate. Then next spring you have your attic insulated and get a $500 rebate from FortisBC. Because you’ve made two eligible upgrades within 18 months of each other, you’re eligible for the $300 two-upgrade bonus. All you have to do is check the bonus check box when you apply for your second rebate. So not only are you getting $2,500 in rebates and ongoing savings on your home’s heating and cooling bills for years to come, you’re also getting an extra $300 just for being energy efficient.

FortisBC is committed to helping customers reduce their energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions and improve the comfort of their homes. That’s why they only provide rebates on the most efficient products and equipment and also require them to be installed to quality standards. For example, if your insulation isn’t installed improperly, your home won’t hold in the heat as well and it could also create mold and safety hazards. To support quality work, FortisBC requires that heat pumps be installed by a licensed electrician and insulation be installed by a licensed contractor. They even have a list of program-registered insulation contractors you can use.

Now, that’s energy at work.

*Conditions apply. Not all upgrades are eligible for the $300 two-upgrade bonus. Full program terms and conditions are available at fortisbc.com/homerebates. This program may be changed or cancelled at any time.

 

Investing in a new high-efficiency furnace or increasing your attic insulation will not only reduce your home’s energy costs year-after-year, you may also be eligible for rebates through FortisBC’s Home Renovation Rebate Program and CleanBC Home Efficiency Rebates.

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