Bob Kuhn, who has been acting as interim president at Trinity Western University, has taken over as the university's fourth president.

Bob Kuhn named president of Trinity Western University

Lawyer and alumnus has served as interim TWU president since last July.

  • Mar. 12, 2014 5:00 p.m.

Trinity Western University announced Tuesday that Bob Kuhn will be its fourth president and vice chancellor. Kuhn has served as the university’s interim president since July 2013.

“After 52 years of growth and miraculous accomplishments, Trinity Western University has found its place as a leader among the ranks of Christian higher education,” Kuhn said. “Whether it be in groundbreaking research or by winning championships in elite collegiate sports, TWU has consistently proven that it punches above its weight in transformational university education, maintaining a global impact of significance. I couldn’t be more proud of being an alumnus, and now the president, of such an extraordinary university.”

Kuhn’s appointment to a five-year term follows the unanimous recommendation by the presidential search committee, which conducted a comprehensive search over the past eight months for the best person to assume the position of president. The committee was made up of a broad representation of TWU constituencies.

“In his role as interim president, Kuhn has made significant progress in developing a vision of not just what TWU can and will become (as God provides),” said Board of Governors chair Jeremy Funk, “but also how that calling can be achieved.”

When appointed interim president last July, Kuhn said he was committed to being an encouragement to faculty, staff and students.

“My approach is relational,” said Kuhn. “To me, it’s less about the presidency and more about building relationships with the broad spectrum of constituents that form the Trinity community.”

The time he spent gaining insight and knowledge from students, faculty, staff, parents, and alumni culminated into the development of a draft strategy framework — the New Era — that outlines the way forward for the institution. He announced the New Era vision to friends and supporters at TWU’s 2013 Christmas in the City gala.

“As the Board of Governors, we are eager to see how [the New Era] vision for growth and sustainability can further draw the TWU community together,” said Funk. In the midst of some significant political and social challenges to TWU’s core identity as a Christian institution of higher learning, and with growing tension within Canadian society, Kuhn has proven to be a case of the right person, in the right place, at the right time, the board feels.

“His life experience, professional, community, and alumni contacts, and collaborative and relational leadership style are what TWU requires at this point in its institutional life,” said Funk.

As interim president, Kuhn has not only infused the TWU campus with hope and encouragement, he has also led the legal and very public battle over the University’s proposed law school with strength, compassion, and grace.

A graduate of UBC School of Law and a practicing lawyer for over 33 years, Kuhn is no stranger to leadership at Trinity Western. He served as student body president from 1971-72 and, in 2001, Kuhn led TWU’s legal team all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada, successfully defending TWU’s Teacher Education Program vs. the BC College of Teachers.

He will be formally inaugurated as president in September.

“We desire to see TWU remain faithful in its divine calling of developing godly Christian leaders for the various marketplaces of life,” said Funk. “We are confident that Bob Kuhn, a Trinity Western alumnus (’72) and TWU’s fourth president, will lead Canada’s premier Christian university into a new era of profound national and global impact.”

In addition to writing regularly for various award-winning publications, Kuhn has lectured throughout Canada on a broad array of legal topics for numerous groups, such as the Continuing Legal Education Society of British Columbia; the University of British Columbia; Institute of Chartered Accountants; and the Provincial Court Judges of British Columbia.

In 2012, the TWU Board of Governors conferred on Kuhn an honorary Doctor of Laws in recognition of his service to Canada and to the university, which has spanned over three decades and contributed to the leadership of each of TWU’s three previous presidents. Born in Vernon, Kuhn is married to Renae, also a Trinity alumnus (‘72), and they have three adult children and one grandson.

“In addition to this vision, Bob is extremely passionate about the mission and ministry of TWU, which we see as vital for effective leadership.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Bowen Byram played three seasons with the Vancouver Giants and will take part in the National Junior Team Selection Camp. (Rob Wilton)
Langley-based Giants player picked for national junior camp

Bowen Byram made quite a name for himself in three seasons with the Vancouver Giants

Aldor Acres is open to the public for pumpkin picking and animal visiting. (Ryan Uytdewilligen/Aldergrove Star)
Our View: Caution requires creativity this Halloween in Langley

And remember, no big parties, or you’ll get a trick in the form of a fine!

R.E. Mountain Secondary (Langley School District)
COVID-19 exposure issued for R.E. Mountain Secondary in Langley

Four schools have been removed from the list of exposures

Submit letters to the editor through our website, via email or in writing.
LETTER: Education is key to creating an equal world

Aldergrove reader ‘resentful’ of response by Christian Heritage Party candidate

Did those election signs change anyone’s mind in Langley? Something did. (Joti Grewal/Langley Advance Times files)
Painful Truth: Demographic transition an election fairy tale

It turns out people in Langley actually can change their minds

Burnaby RCMP responded to a dine-and-dash suspect who fell through a ceiling in March 2020. (RCMP handout)
VIDEO: Suspected dine-and-dasher falls through ceiling of Burnaby restaurant

A woman believed to be dashing on her restaurant bill fell through the kitchen ceiling

B.C. Premier John Horgan and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee arrive for annual Cascadia conference in Vancouver, Oct. 10, 2018. They have agreed to coordinate the permanent switch to daylight saving time. (B.C. government)
B.C. still awaiting U.S. approval to eliminate daylight saving time

Clocks going back one hour Nov. 1 in Washington too

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with US Vice-President Joe Biden on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, December 9, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
A Biden presidency could mean good news for Canadian environment policy: observers

Experts and observers say even a U.S. outside the Paris agreement may ultimately end up in the same place

People take a photo together during the opening night of Christmas Lights Across Canada, in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. The likelihood that most Canadians will enjoy a holly jolly Christmas season of gatherings, caroling and travel is unlikely, say public health experts who encourage those who revel in holiday traditions to accept more sacrifices ahead. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Ho, ho, no: Experts advise preparing for a scaled-back COVID holiday season

Many of the holiday season’s highlights have already been scrapped or are unlikely to take place

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Sen. Kim Pate is shown in Toronto in an October 15, 2013, file photo. The parliamentary budget office says a proposed law that would give judges discretion on whether to apply a lesser sentence for murder could save the federal government $8.3 million per year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel
Judicial discretion for mandatory minimum sentences for murder would save $8.3M: PBO

The result would be fewer people in long-term custody at federal correctional institutions, experts say

Commissioner Austin Cullen looks at documents before opening statements at the Cullen Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia, in Vancouver on February 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
RCMP lacked dedicated team to investigate illegal activities at casino, inquiry hears

Hearings for the inquiry are set to continue into next week and the inquiry is expected to wrap up next year

Robert Riley Saunders. (File)
Court approves money for B.C. foster children alleging harm from Kelowna social worker

The maximum combined total award for basic payments and elevated damages for an individual is $250,000

Most Read