The light green line shows the pipeline’s proposed route through Langley, and the grey line shows the route of the existing Trans Mountain line. (Trans Mountain/special to the Langley Advance Times)

The light green line shows the pipeline’s proposed route through Langley, and the grey line shows the route of the existing Trans Mountain line. (Trans Mountain/special to the Langley Advance Times)

Construction starts on Trans Mountain in Langley next year

The pipeline is planned to go through Redwoods Golf Course

Construction on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Langley is expected to start next year, the company said.

Prep work on the pipeline in Surrey is starting this fall, and work is currently underway on a tank farm on Sumas Mountain in Abbotsford, which is expected to last into 2022.

But work hasn’t yet started in Langley, where the new stretch of pipeline will cross parts of Glen Valley, Fort Langley, and Walnut Grove.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline moves oil and bitumen from Alberta to Burnaby, where it is either refined for local use as fuel or loaded onto tankers for export.

The controversial expansion project will almost triple the capacity of the pipeline.

While work is getting underway soon in Langley’s neighbours, the exact date work on the pipeline will start in Langley isn’t yet known.

“We anticipate construction in Langley to occur in 2021 – 2022,” said a statement from Trans Mountain. “More details about the schedule are currently under development, subject to CER [Canada Energy Regulator] decision with respect to the detailed route.”

The proposed route in Langley, which has not yet received all final approvals, crosses 276th Street on the Abbotsford-Langley border just north of 64th Avenue, and continues in a north-westerly direction through the Glen Valley area.

The route follows the existing pipeline route – which dates back to the 1950s – until it nears the outskirts of Walnut Grove.

The plan then calls for the pipeline to veer north through the Redwoods Golf Course, then turn west again, paralleling the CN Rail tracks to the Golden Ears Bridge, and then Golden Ears Way to the border with Surrey.

The pipeline crosses 264th Street, 232nd Street, Glover Road, 88th Avenue, and 208th Street, among other busy local roads.

“Our goal is to minimize impacts on residents and traffic,” Trans Mountain said about dealing with traffic disruptions. “Detailed traffic plans are being developed in consultation with the Township of Langley.”

Trans Mountain and the Township announced a $1.4 million Community Benefit Agreement recently, which will go towards several projects, most notably a cycling and pedestrian overpass in the core of Fort Langley.

READ MORE: Trans Mountain deal means new Fort Langley footbridge

The company has been striking similar contracts with other communities, including with Surrey, where it is contributing $500,000 for new trail networks.

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