A B.C. Supreme Court judge in Victoria on Tuesday awarded $98,794.86 in damages to a man who alleged he suffered “nervous shock” after witnessing a motorcycle strike his wife as the couple jaywalked across Victoria’s Yates Street. (Black Press Media file photo)

Husband of jaywalking couple awarded $98,000 in damages after seeing wife get hit

His wife was hit by a motorcycle as the pair crossed Victoria’s Yates Street in 2013

A Victoria man who alleged he suffered “nervous shock” after witnessing a motorcycle strike his wife as the couple jaywalked across Yates Street has been awarded almost $100,000.

The 48-year-old, Ariston Quirimit Marcena, was awarded $98,794.86 in damages in a ruling Tuesday from B.C. Supreme Court Justice Jennifer Power.

According to the ruling, Marcena’s wife was hit by a motorcycle, driven by defendant Barry Robert Thomson, while the couple attempted to cross Yates Street, just east of Cook Street, on the morning of March 20, 2013.

The two had just left a medical imaging appointment for Ms. Marcena. The husband initiated the jaywalking instead of going to the light-controlled intersection, the ruling said.

“There is no question that Mr. Marcena is partially liable for the injury he suffered,” Power wrote, highlighting his actions as negligent and in breach of B.C.’s Motor Vehicle Act.

“Nonetheless, I find that Mr. Thomson bears some liability for the accident.”

Thomson, who did not testify at trial but whose pre-trial testimony was considered by Power, had said nothing was obstructing his view down Yates Street.

Ms. Marcena, who was wearing a bright yellow sweater, and her husband managed to pass through a parking lane, a bike lane and a driving lane before she was hit. An elderly woman was crossing the area at roughly the same time and two vehicles had stopped in the right lane, with one independent witness stating the vehicles were stopped for almost a minute to allow the three pedestrians to pass.

“I conclude that there was a hazard to be seen and that Mr. Thomson either failed to see it or failed to take appropriate evasive action,” Power wrote. “Had he slowed in response to the halted vehicles in lane one, or upon seeing the Marcenas — who were there to be seen — enter the road, he could have avoided the accident.”

Power, after totalling damages at slightly more than $395,000, reached the judgment amount after assigning Thomson 25 per cent liability.

She wrote the evidence — which included opinions from two medical experts — confirmed Marcena suffered psychiatric injury as a result of the collision and that a diagnosis of major depression was tied to the crash. He has also “suffered from poor concentration, inadequate sleep, decreased energy levels, lack of motivation, headaches and forgetfulness” since the crash, and has been unable to work since 2014. His relationships with his wife and son were also impacted, Power wrote.

His wife, Ms. Marcena, filed a separate action for damages, which has since settled.

READ ALSO: UPDATED: Motorcyclist seriously injured in parking lot crash near Trans-Canada Highway

READ ALSO: Jaywalkers struck Thursday morning on Quadra Street in rush hour MVI


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Wildlife groups express concern animal-trap-related injuries are on the rise

Langley’s Critter Care Wildlife Society had nine cases in 2017, 15 in 2018, and 21 this year

WEATHER: Langley weekend weather forecast

A break from wet weather expected

Willowbrook gift wrap centre in Langley all for charity

Proceeds to benefit Heart and Stroke Foundation

‘Suspicious incidents’ part of reason for surveillance at Langley shooting site

Police are still on scene at an Aldergrove property where a man was shot last month

Long-serving Langley City councillor Jack Arnold dies

Arnold passed away in his sleep on Dec. 11

VIDEO: Langley’s newest high school officially opens

A brief ceremony Thursday morning allowed all the players involved in new school to celebrate

B.C. Crown corporation immune from taxation, but still might have to pay GST: Court

British Columbia Investment Management Corporation may still be on hook for GPS payments

‘He was good for the West:’ Sadness, surprise in Saskatchewan over Scheer

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe and his predecessor, Brad Wall, both thanked Andrew Scheer

Poll suggests travellers know little about air-passenger rights

The first set of passenger-rights rules landed in mid-July and the rest this weekend

Johnson claims Brexit mandate with new conservative majority

Conservative Party wins 365 seats in the House of Commons

‘British Columbians are paying too much’: Eby directs ICBC to delay rate application

Attorney General David Eby calls for delay in order to see how two reforms play out

VIDEO: Octopus, bald eagle battle after bird ‘bites off more than it can chew’ in B.C. waters

B.C. crew films fight between the two feisty animals in Quatsino off north Vancouver Island

Most Read