Big Rock in Aldergrove Lake Park is a giant reminder of the last Ice Age which left this huge boulder behind as the glacier receded.

Big Rock in Aldergrove Lake Park is a giant reminder of the last Ice Age which left this huge boulder behind as the glacier receded.

Input sought on Aldergrove Lake’s future

Metro Vancouver Parks is seeking public input on proposed plans for Aldergrove Lake Regional Park on Saturday, June 2.

Metro Vancouver Parks is seeking public input on proposed plans for Aldergrove Lake Regional Park on Saturday, June 2.

It begins with a session at the Dog Off-Leash Area between 10 and 11:30 a.m. Participants are asked to bring ideas, walking shoes and a leash for the dog while walking through the other areas of the park. The off-leash area is at the corner of Lefeuvre Road and 8 Avenue.

In the afternoon there will be another session at the Blacktail Picnic Shelter (use the main entrance at 8 Avenue to access this area). There will be free games, food and fun from 1 to 3:30 p.m., and participants can bring their families to share their thoughts with park planners.

Aldergrove Lake Regional Park straddles the southeast corner of Langley and southwest corner of Abbotsford, and hugs the U.S. border to the south along Zero Avenue. The park offers expansive and stunning views of neighbouring agricultural lands and the Coast Mountains, including Mount Baker.

Features of the park include Aldergrove Bowl, the historic lake site, heritage homes and farms, Pepin Brook — home to endangered Nooksack Dace and Salish Sucker — and the Big Rock, a remnant of the last Ice Age.

Some 280 hectares in size, the park welcomes around 350,000 visitors a year, who come to walk, jog, cycle, ride horseback, view wildlife, enjoy nature, or let their dog romp in the leash-optional area.

The process to create the management plan for this big, beautiful public space is now underway. The management plan will set up a policy framework that helps to express a common understanding of the park’s future vision, goals and objectives, identify opportunities and constraints for various park uses, make management intentions transparent, and the decisions of staff and management accountable.

For more information call Elizabeth Birss at 604-530-4983.