Langley Art Council’s newest exhibit examines ‘invasive species’

Langley Art Council’s newest exhibit examines ‘invasive species’

Aldergrove high schoolers partner up and learn from from long-time artist

Bob Gunner and high school art students partnered for the Langley Arts Council’s second exhibit, entitled Flora Connections, where both endangered plant and human species were memorialized in art.

Gunner, a painter of 40 years, first began researching his current collection six years ago, upon retiring from a full-time career in sales.

His work depicts mortuary poles of notable Haida Gwaii chiefs from various different tribes and is available for viewing at the art council space at the Kinsmen Community Centre until Sunday (June 16).

“Haida Gwaii is a whole chain of islands… at its height there were 28 tribes and 30,000 people. By the end of the 1800s there were 300 people left. They were wiped out by smallpox because that’s what the English sailors brought with them,” Gunner said to the students.

Aldergrove Community Secondary School (ACSS) art teacher, Dianne Courtney, said the two-part exhibit can be summed up simply as: “Invasive people, invasive plants.”

Grade 11 and 12 students were tasked with choosing an invasive or endangered plant species to illustrate in linocuts – a printmaking technique where images are carved into linoleum and then transferred onto a canvas using ink.

Courtney led the class with the help of SFU student teacher Lauralee Lamarche.

“Our goal was to make the students more aware of their environment,” Courtney said.

High school senior Queenie Lee chose to depict the puncture vine, an invasive species with the “strength to pierce through human skin as well as tougher materials including rubber tires,” she said.

The invasive vine, a.k.a. tribulus terrestris, is toxic if ingested by animals.

“It’s almost like its own fairytale,” Lee explained, “As a foreign character in a foreign land, it fights to live.”

Mackenzie Laird, another graduating student, chose a more “aesthetic” plant – lamiastrum galeobdolon.

“It’s leaves were silver and sparkly,” Laird said as a reason for its choosing, along with the mention of its yellow florals.

Ashley Moore’s piece was one that depicted a scentless chamomile plant.

“It was fun to keep chipping away the linoleum,” Moore said about the creative process, “It was very relaxing.”

Moore was recently accepted into Max the Mutt College of Animation, Arts and Design in Toronto for the fall.

The adjoined exhibit will runin the arts council space at the Kinsmen Community Centre until Sunday (June 16).

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Mackenzie Laird, another graduating student, chose a more “aesthetic” plant – lamiastrum galeobdolon, to create a linocut of. (Sarah Grochowski photo)

Mackenzie Laird, another graduating student, chose a more “aesthetic” plant – lamiastrum galeobdolon, to create a linocut of. (Sarah Grochowski photo)

Artist Bob Gunner partnered with ACSS students showcase an exhibit of Haida Gwaii tributary paintings (Sarah Grochowski photo)

Artist Bob Gunner partnered with ACSS students showcase an exhibit of Haida Gwaii tributary paintings (Sarah Grochowski photo)

Ashley Moore’s piece was one that depicted a scentless chamomile plant. She was recently accepted into Max the Mutt College of Animation, Arts and Design in Toronto for the fall. (Sarah Grochowski photo)

Ashley Moore’s piece was one that depicted a scentless chamomile plant. She was recently accepted into Max the Mutt College of Animation, Arts and Design in Toronto for the fall. (Sarah Grochowski photo)

Langley Art Council’s newest exhibit examines ‘invasive species’

Langley Art Council’s newest exhibit examines ‘invasive species’

Just Posted

Photo collage of loved ones lost to substance use and overdose. (Photo courtesy Moms Stop The Harm)
B.C. overdose deaths still rising 5 years after public health emergency declared

Moms Stop the Harm calls on B.C. to provide safe supply in response to deadly illicit drug use

Maple Ridge's Doug Ubell caught some photographs recently that he was anxious to share, one taken while on the Trans-Canada Trail looking southwest towards the Pitt River Bridge, and another from on Golden Ears Bridge. (Special to The News)
Traffic on Golden Ears Bridge returning to pre-pandemic levels

Commuters from Langley, Pitt Meadows, and Maple Ridge still driving more, taking transit less

A local letter writer is irate that tourists and people in the area of the resort community of Whistler are considered a higher vaccination priority than emergency personnel and other frontline workers. (Whistler Blackcomb photo)
LETTER: Langley man loses confidence in NDP after Whistler vaccination decision

Emergency personnel and other frontline workers should be vaccinated before Whistler tourists

Langley-Aldergrove MP Tako van Popta will be at a ceremony marking 70 years since Canadian soldiers fought at the Battle of Kapyong, held at the Gapyeong Memorial in Langley’s Derek Doubleday Arboretum on Friday, April 16. (Special to the Langley Advance Times)
Langley battle memorial marks 70 years since pivotal clash in Korean War

The Gapyeong Memorial will host a small, private ceremony this Friday

Prince George Cougars triumph over the Langley-based Vancouver Giants Monday night, by the score of 4-1. That follows a similar defeat on Saturday by the same team. (Cougar’s Allen Douglas/Special to Black Press Media)
Vancouver Giants fall in 4-1 loss to Prince George

WHL hockey team goes up against Victoria in Kamloops on Thursday

A person receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS
B.C. sees 873 more COVID-19 cases Tuesday, decline continues

Hospitalizations up to 377, two more deaths for 1,515 total

This 2013 Dodge Ram 1500 was stolen from Black Creek Motors at approximately 2 a.m. Sunday, April 11. Photos via blackcreekmotors.com
VIDEO: B.C. car dealer posts clip of thieves towing a truck right off his lot

Video shows one white truck towing another off Vancouver Island lot

White Rock's popularity as a destination places it in a difficult position in ensuring provincial health orders are followed, Coun. David Chesney said, asking that staff obtain impartial input from both Fraser Health and the Ministry of Health before further measures are debated. (File photo)
Pandemic crowding on waterfront vexes White Rock council

Overcrowding, extra garbage the downside of take-out business

FILE – People hold signs during a memorial march to remember victims of overdose deaths in Vancouver on Saturday, August 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. to request federal exemption for simple drug possession

Announcement comes on 5-year anniversary of B.C.’s first public health emergency

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

(AP Photo/Matthias Schrader, FIle)
Rare blood clots ‘may be linked’ to AstraZeneca vaccines: Health Canada

One case of the adverse effect has been reported in Canada

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 5, 2021. The province has restricted indoor dining at all restaurants in B.C. due to a spike in COVID-19 numbers. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C.’s COVID-19 indoor dining, drinking ban extending into May

Restaurant association says patio rules to be clarified

Two men walk past a sign on Main Street in downtown Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Calls for government transparency in COVID data continue as B.C.’s 3rd wave wears on

Social media, where both information and misinformation can spread like wildfire, has not helped

Two men were seen removing red dresses alongside the Island Highway in Oyster Bay. (Submitted photo)
Observers ‘gutted’ as pair filmed removing red dresses hung along B.C. highway

Activists hung the dresses to raise awareness for Indigenous Murdered/Missing Women & Girls

Most Read