Langley Township council has passed a tree protection bylaw. (Langley Advance Times files)

Langley Township tree bylaw now in effect

Landowners now need a permit for most tree cutting on private property

A tree protection bylaw took effect in Langley Township this week after council gave its final approval to the new bylaw on Monday night.

The new regulations mean property owners who want to cut or remove a tree from their property must apply for a permit, with a few exceptions for smaller diameter trees.

However, the bylaw does not affect tree removal for farmland, and trees can also be removed for construction activities, whether for building a new driveway or for a major multi-family development.

Trees that are hazardous can also be removed.

The Township council has debated for years whether it should pass a tree protection bylaw, as most neighbouring communities including Surrey and Abbotsford have.

Brookswood was covered under an interim tree protection bylaw since its new official community plan was put in place two years ago.

Members of the public who spoke up at a hearing this spring were divided between those who urged the council to adopt the bylaw, or even stronger measures, and those who opposed it as too expensive or onerous for landowners.

The fee is $100 per tree to be cut down, but homeowners can remove one tree from their land for any reason in each 24-month period.

Applications for tree removal can be found online at tol.ca/treeprotection, or in person at the Township of Langley’s Engineering Division in the Civic Facility at 20338 65 Ave., or at the Operations Centre at 4700 224 St.

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