No change in land ownership of ferry dock

TransLink owns one of the two docks at the northern tip of Glover Road. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans owns the other, while the Ministry of Transportation and Highways retains control over Glover Road.

It has been more than two years since the Golden Ears Bridge made the Fort Langley-Albion ferry superfluous.

The demise of the water transportation link restored peace to the northern end of Glover Road, and especially to the Kwantlen First Nation members who live there.

It also created the opportunity for people staying at Fort Camping on Brae Island, visitors to Fort Langley and residents the chance to enjoy a piece of Langley undisturbed by traffic.

The area is  especially attractive for dog owners because it is one of only a few in Langley where dogs can run off-leash.

That’s what drew Walnut Grove resident Jon Moorhouse. But on Aug. 17, Moorhouse was told that the land at the northern end of Glover Road had been sold to a private interest and was no longer accessible to the public.

“I innocently took my dog for a walk,” Moorhouse said, adding that he was “harassed” by someone who told him he was on private land.

He was given the information by a man who called himself a caretaker, and lives in an old trailer near the old docks. He has apparently spun the same tale to other visitors.

“There has been no change in property ownership,” said Brenda Fernie, director of Seyem Qwantlen. And there is no caretaker.

Fernie added that the man who lives in the trailer had even told someone that he is a caretaker for TransLink.

The transportation authority owns one of the two docks at the northern tip of Glover Road. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans owns the other, while the Ministry of Transportation and Highways retains control over Glover Road.

Fernie said that people are welcome to walk in the area “as long as they are respectful and clean up after their dogs.”