Parole board deems Brian Abrosimo too dangerous to be let out

Abrosimo said the 'monster' is tamed but board disagrees. Abrosimo kidnapped and sexually assaulted Langley girl in 2004.

Brian Abrosimo seen here in a very dated photo was denied parole recently, with the conclusion that he is still very much a danger to society. In 2005, he was sentenced to 14 years for kidnapping and assaulting an 11 -year-old Langley girl.

A B.C. parole board has concluded that Brian Abrosimo is likely to seriously harm someone if he is let out of jail at this time.

In 2006, Abrosimo, 52, was sentenced to 14 years in prison, followed by a 10-year supervision order for abducting an 11-year-old Langley girl from a rural Aldergrove road.

In August 2004, he used his van to knock down two children who were riding bicycles along 256 Street, kidnapping the 11-year-old girl, taping her eyes and mouth and driving her to Surrey where he sexually assaulted her.

She got out of the van and ran off and she ran to a nearby home.

Her friend was left behind in a ditch, with cuts, bruises and a broken wrist, watching the van disappear.

Abrosimo was also convicted of handcuffing and gagging a sex-trade worker before violently assaulting and raping her the month prior to the abduction of the Langley girl.

On July 16, the parole board voted to detain Abrosimo until the end of his sentence in 2020, concluding that “there is no supervision programs that would protect the community adequately from the risk that you present at this time.”

A psychological risk assessment done on Abrosimo on June 2, concluded that he is impulsive and has a ‘very high risk to reoffend, both generally and with sexual violence.’

The parole board noted that the emotional damage Abrosimo has inflicted on his victims is permanent and devastating.

The girl’s family urged the parole board to keep Abrosimo behind bars forever.

At the hearing, Abrosimo told board members that he attributed his actions to his addiction to meth and the “monster within.”

He assured them he would never use drugs again and that “the monster is dead.”

But the board found his observations to be naive and optimistic. In December 2013, he punched another offender in the face in an unprovoked attack.

At the parole hearing, Abrosimo revealed that when he snatched the girl in 2004, he had actually intended to keep her for a day or so.

Prior to abducting the girl he had altered the appearance of his van, placed a mattress in it. There were handcuffs, bolt cutters and a handgun in the van at the time of the kidnapping.

Prior to the crime, he was frequenting crack houses, exchanging money for sex.

Abrosimo’s criminal history dates back to 1986, and includes impaired driving, making threats and using violence to gain compliance from victims.

In 1992, he gagged and raped his former girlfriend. At one point, her children were present.

Abrosimo was convicted of that crime in 1995 and received a two-year sentence. After being released on full parole a year later, he was arrested for firing a gun multiple times at a man.

In 2003, while high on drugs, he threatened to shoot a police officer and himself. He claimed to have a gun but was, in fact, in possession of a stapler.

In 2004, before the kidnapping  and sexual assault of the Langley girl, he went back to the home of his ex-wife and assaulted her, allegedly attempting to rape her again.

Abrosimo suffered a brain injury during a jail riot in 2008. But, since birth, he has had limited cognitive abilities and low intelligence.

In his sentencing report, the court learned that Abrosimo was sent to a special needs school where it is alleged he was physically and sexually abused.

In 2010, he tried to sue the Attorney General, saying he was being harshly treated during his incarceration and that his life had been threatened.

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