Rescued Langley dogs steadily improving

Some will be ready for adoption in a few weeks, SPCA says; province to tighten breeder regulations

One of 66 dogs seized from a Langley property in early February. Earlier this week, the B.C. government announced new regulations for dog and cat breeders, which will take effect in 2017.

One of 66 dogs seized from a Langley property in early February. Earlier this week, the B.C. government announced new regulations for dog and cat breeders, which will take effect in 2017.

The 66 sick and neglected puppies and adult dogs seized from a Langley puppy mill are responding well to treatment and some will be ready for adoption in a few weeks, says the BC SPCA.

“Our major challenge right now is that all the dogs are under quarantine because of ring worm,” said Marcie Moriarty, chief prevention and enforcement officer for the BC SPCA.

“Some of the dogs require further emotional support and will be with us longer.”

The dogs were seized from a Langley breeder in early February.

An SPCA statement said the dogs had serious “medical and psychological issues,” including broken bones, missing ears and eyes, infections and abscesses, dental disease, severe matting and overgrown nails.

The starving dogs were living in small, stacked crates and cages, in dark, unheated buildings.

“It is inconceivable to think that anyone allowed these innocent animals to suffer like this,” said Moriarty.

The breeders had been on the SPCA radar for a number of years, with several people laying formal complaints against them.

“These guys were so professional at evading us and popping up again. It took a detailed complaint straight from a current buyer for us to get a warrant,” said Moriarty.

The SPCA is still waiting for all the reports from the veterinarian who has been looking after the seized dogs. Those medical reports will be sent to Crown counsel with the hope criminal charges will proceed.

Meanwhile, 70 cats and several dogs were seized from a Surrey breeder last week.

The B.C. government has announced new regulations are coming to require dog and cat breeders to meet national standards for their care.

Expected to take effect in 2017, the rules will require daily cleaning of pens, minimum space for each animal depending on its size, and veterinary care for dogs and cats that are sick, injured or in pain.

A registration system would allow animal inspectors to inspect premises, rather than wait for public complaints.

– with files from Tom Fletcher, Black Press