Brian Edward Abrosimo, shown here in a photo taken several years ago, was convicted of abducting and sexually assaulting an 11-year-old girl in Aldergrrove.

Brian Edward Abrosimo, shown here in a photo taken several years ago, was convicted of abducting and sexually assaulting an 11-year-old girl in Aldergrrove.

Restrictions loosened for convicted rapist and kidnapper

Brian Edward Abrosimo abducted and sexually assaulted an 11-year-old girl in Langley.

A man convicted of kidnapping and sexually assaulting an 11-year-old Langley girl will be free to leave his halfway house without supervision and without a curfew.

A July 22 Parole Board of Canada hearing, just released, has lifted restrictions that limit Brian Edward Abrosimo to one-hour day trips from the community residential facility (CRF) in the Okanagan where he lives, and eliminated a requirement that he must be accompanied by a male staff member.

While Abrosimo has “an extensive criminal record that demonstrates a pattern of persistent violent behaviour,” and “a poor community supervision history” where he has “breached conditions and returned to high-risk behaviour,” the written decision went on to note the 56-year-old has “demonstrated compliant and stable behaviour for over six months.”

With the restrictions lifted, the plan is to gradually allow Abrosimo more independence.

“The first step would be to let you walk to and from the parole office and the police building for your mandatory reporting, as well as to your counselling sessions,” the judgment stated.

READ MORE: Child kidnapper and rapist released to halfway house in Okanagan

In 2006, Abrosimo was sentenced to 14 years in prison, followed by a 10-year supervision order for abducting an 11-year-old Langley girl from a rural Aldergrove road two years earlier.

In August 2004, he used his van to knock down two children who were riding bicycles along 256 Street, kidnapping the 11-year-old girl, taping her eyes and mouth and driving her to Surrey where he sexually assaulted her.

She managed to get out of the van and ran, barefoot, through a field, to a nearby home.

Her friend was left behind in a ditch with cuts, bruises and a broken wrist.

Abrosimo was also convicted of handcuffing and gagging a sex-trade worker before violently assaulting and raping her the month prior to the abduction of the Langley girl.

At a previous parole hearing, the girl’s father had urged the parole board to keep Abrosimo behind bars forever.

The victim’s dad said if Abrosimo was released he should not be able to go near Langley or Abbotsford.

A geographic ban was imposed and remains in effect, along with bans against being in the presence of under-18 female children without another adult present who knows his criminal history and has been approved by his parole officer as well as avoiding areas like schools, parks and playgrounds where under-18 children are likely to congregate.

In the many victim impact statements made, it was learned that the girl suffers mentally and physically from the attack and has lost her sense of trust.

The other girl Abrosimo hit with his van suffers extreme neck and back pain.

Prior to abducting the girl he had altered the appearance of his van and placed a mattress inside it. There were handcuffs, bolt cutters and a handgun in the van at the time of the kidnapping.

Prior to the crime, he frequented crack houses, exchanging money for sex.

Abrosimo’s criminal history dates back to 1986 and includes theft, weapons, break and enter, sexual assault, assault and failure to comply offences.

In 1992, he gagged and raped his former girlfriend. At one point, her children were present.

Abrosimo was convicted of that crime in 1995 and received a two-year sentence. After being released on full parole a year later, he was arrested after he fired four shots, from a handgun, at his sister’s ex-boyfriend.

In 2003, while high on drugs, he threatened to shoot a police officer and himself. He claimed to have a gun but was, in fact, in possession of a stapler.

In 2004, before the kidnapping and sexual assault of the Langley girl, he went to the home of his ex-wife and assaulted her, allegedly attempting to rape her again.

Abrosimo suffered a brain injury during a jail riot in 2008. But since birth, he has had limited cognitive abilities and low intelligence.

.

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Email: dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

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