Artist rendering of the affordable apartment buildings proposed on the Shepherd of the Valley Church property in Willoughby.

Shepherd of the Valley church moves ahead with affordable housing project

Township council unanimously granted first and second reading to Willoughby development

Before unanimously granting first and second reading to a new affordable housing project in Willoughby, Township councillors offered praise to Shepherd of the Valley for its vision.

The Lutheran church has partnered with non-profit Catalyst Community Development Society to build 82 affordable rental apartment units and five single family lots on the church property at 20097 72 Ave.

The rental units include 70 apartments for seniors and 12 apartments for families. The single family lots will be sold at market value.

BC Housing has given preliminary approval of $5 million in funding from the Investment in Housing Innovation program for the project.

Coun. Charlie Fox offered compliments on the layout of the property, and the inclusion of a dental office and small shops for seniors to walk to.

“I think this is a great step forward,” Fox said.

“I realize … this project may still have its detractors, but I think that this is what’s necessary in our community, and we see non-profits entering into arrangements with providers like this on property that is sitting stagnant at this point in time and not fully being utilized.”

“I think this is a fantastic project, we certainly need more rental units,” added Coun. Blair Whitmarsh. He asked staff about the definition of “affordable,” and how the Township can ensure the rentals remain affordable in the future.

Ramin Seifi, Township general manager of engineering and community development, said there’s no definition of affordable — that’s up to the operators — but he has “no doubt” they will use the same standard as elsewhere in the industry, which is no more than 30 per cent of household income spent on rent.

Seifi also said that through a housing agreement with the Township, the intent of the rental building will remain the same.

Coun. Petrina Arnason said the church has done a “great job” in engaging the community, as she witnessed significant changes come about as a result of the feedback from local residents.

“I just want to refer to the fact that when I was there last time, there had been significant improvements,” Arnason said. “Because BC Housing is involved, they have a conservation policy for energy, and so there’s going to be heightened energy conservation, which allows for those houses or apartments to be more energy efficient, and therefore more cost effective in the longer term. They’ve also expanded the green space that would be available there for the use of everybody there on the property.”



miranda@langleytimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Championship action kicks off tonight at Langley Events Centre

Giants prepare to do battle in Game 1 of the Western Conference finals Friday on home ice

PHOTOS: Langley RCMP volunteers ‘represent the best of our community’

Dozens were honoured Thursday night during the 27th annual Langley RCMP’s volunteer dinner

Langley MP describes most recent diagnosis as a ‘miracle’

Tory Member of Parliament Mark Warawa doesn’t have pancreatic cancer, but operable colon cancer

Langley Advance Times Community Calendar: April 18, 2019, edition

• Submit Langley events to: news@langleyadvancetimes.com (Subject: Community Calendar)

VIDEO: Alberta man creates world’s biggest caricature

Dean Foster is trying to break the world record for a radio show contest

B.C. RCMP receive application for Police Cat Services

RCMP announced the launch of the Police Cat Services unit as an April fools joke

Rats available for adoption in Vancouver

In a social media post the City of Vancouver says you can adopt a rat for $5.

Kirkland Signature veggie burgers recalled due to possible metal fragments

Recalled products came in 1.7 kg packages with a best before date of Apr. 23, 2019

Chaos at the ferry terminal for people heading from Vancouver to the Island

Easter crowds create backlog at Tsawwassen ferry terminal

Parents of 13 who tortured children get life after hearing victims

One of their daughters fled their home and pleaded for help to a 911 operator

Crews battle Burnaby blaze; 2 people sent to hospital

Emergency Support Services helping residents displaced by fire

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia at a moderate risk of severe weather

Most Read