Illegal fentanyl lab in the Burnaby apartment, from the 2016 police search. (Delta Police Department photo)

Surrey, Delta men sentenced to 20 years in massive fentanyl lab bust

Charges stem from a 2016 bust where the deadly drug W-18 was also found for the first time in Canada

Two men were sentenced to a combined 20 years in jail for their role in what is considered to be the largest fentanyl laboratory ever discovered in Canada.

Scott Pipping, 36, of Surrey and Adam Summers, 28, of Delta were facing a combined 17 charges, including trafficking in a controlled substance, possession for the purposes of trafficking, possession of restricted or prohibited firearms, and possession of restricted or prohibited firearms without a licence, stemming from a 2016 drug lab bust in Burnaby.

Both men pleaded guilty to the charges and, on June 29, Pipping and Summers were handed 15- and five-year year sentences, respectively.

“These are significant sentences and they reflect the scope and impact of this lab,” Delta Police Chief Neil Dubord said in a press release issued Tuesday afternoon (July 10). “This was a massive lab, and a key part of the drug trade at the time in Metro Vancouver. An entire kitchen in a Burnaby apartment had been converted to process the fentanyl.

“I’m very proud of the work of our officers in shutting this lab down, and have no doubt that many lives were saved as a result of their work.”

RELATED: Delta Police bust Burnaby fentanyl lab, seize $1.5 million in cash, weapons, drugs

The sentencing came more than two years after the pair were arrested. Their arrest came from a lengthy investigation into drug activities taking place in South Delta, which eventually involved members of the Lower Mainland RCMP emergency response team, the RCMP clandestine laboratory enforcement and recovery team, Burnaby and Richmond RCMP, and the Burnaby Fire Department and HAZMAT team.

Over the course of the investigation, police found evidence of drug trafficking at locations in Surrey, Burnaby and Richmond.

In the Burnaby, police found a large-scale lab where fentanyl was being was combined with a cutting agent, coloured brown to look like heroin, and washed in acetic acid to make it smell like heroin.

Police also found $1.5 million in cash, nine guns, large quantities of heroin, cocaine, oxycodone, methamphetamine and furanyl fentanyl. Police also found W-18, a powerful synthetic opioid 100 times more deadly than fentanyl. It marked the first time that the drug was located in B.C.



grace.kennedy@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Langley theatre director aims to show ‘people are all closer than what we perceive’

Canadian premiere of Trans Scripts, Part I: The Women runs March 12 to 21 at Firehall Arts Centre

Langley athletes harvest medals at BC Winter Games

Skaters and gymnasts take top honours

UPDATED: Fraser Valley Cultural Diversity Awards release nominees

Individuals include Langley City coun. Rudy Storeboom and local photographer Mariana Aramburu

VIDEO: Giants winning streak ends at 11 after a 2-1 setback Saturday in Everett

Run of wins matched their longest ever regular season winning streak

Governor general says multiple solutions needed for ‘complicated’ overdose issue

Julie Payette met at a fire hall with firefighters and police officers as well as politicians and health experts

Violent ends to past Indigenous protests haunt Trudeau government

Trudeau adopted a more assertive tone Friday, insisting the barricade must come down

Fraser Health warns some schools of possible COVID-19 exposure

A sixth COVID-19 patient is a woman in her 30s in the Fraser Health region who recently returned from Iran

High-risk sex offender cuts off ankle bracelet, on the loose in Vancouver: police

Vancouver police said Kirstjon Olson, 38, is a provincial sex offender with 27 court-ordered conditions

HIGHLIGHTS: Day one and two at the 2020 BC Winter Games

Athletes had sunny – but cold – weather to work with in Fort St. John

B.C. money laundering inquiry to begin amid hopes for answers, accountability

Eby argued that most B.C. residents already know the previous government, at best, turned a blind eye

Blockades remain in place as Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs returning to B.C.

Hereditary Chief Woos said they are ready to engage in nation-to-nation talks with the B.C.

Tyler Toffoli scores twice, Canucks crush Bruins 9-3

Stecher, Miller each add three points for Vancouver

Zamboni driver, 42, earns NHL win over Maple Leafs

Emergency goalie called into action for Carolina Hurricanes

Most Read