This picture was taken recently of the doe and her two fawns in Brookswood. Critter Care believes this is the same doe that had wire wrapped around her.

This picture was taken recently of the doe and her two fawns in Brookswood. Critter Care believes this is the same doe that had wire wrapped around her.

Wire-tangled doe spotted in Brookswood appears to have freed itself

Accompanied by twins, including a distinctive piebald fawn, the doe has once again been spotted in the neighbourhood

There appears to be good news about a doe that was spotted tangled in wire in Brookswood recently.

New pictures taken by residents in the area show a doe matching the animal’s description with two fawns. The deer does not have wire tangled around her hindquarters.

“We have not been able to confirm 100 per cent that it is her, but we pretty confident that it is,” said Critter Care animal care manager, Angela Fontana.

Critter Care interns have been searching for the elusive deer in an attempt to free her from the that was wire tangled around her back end.

The doe and her two fawns, including a rare piebald (two-tone) deer had been seen hanging around behind Brennan’s Mens Wear in Brookswood.

It’s not known how the deer got free of the wire, but everyone at Critter Care is glad she did so she can continue caring for her young ones, said Fontana.

The doe had a patchy backside where she was missing some fur and in the recent picture, that was also the case.

The piebald fawn she has with her is rare and is an inherited defect that affects less than one per cent of white-tailed deer population, according to several online deer publications.

There is also a doe with a piebald fawn that has been seen in Langley City, near the Double Day Arboretum in recent weeks.

This Sunday, Critter Care hosts its annual Walk on the Wild Side at Campbell Valley Park at 11:30 a.m. They invite residents to come walk around the scenic park to help raise funds for the wildlife rehabilitation society that helps more than 1,000 injured and orphaned wild life, including more than a dozen fawns this year. Leashed dogs are welcome on the walk.