A series of sculptures and granite monuments, including this one, at Ieper, in Belgium, pay tribute to the sacrifice of Canadian soldiers who died at Vimy Ridge 95 years ago this Easter Monday.

A series of sculptures and granite monuments, including this one, at Ieper, in Belgium, pay tribute to the sacrifice of Canadian soldiers who died at Vimy Ridge 95 years ago this Easter Monday.

April 9 is anniversary of Vimy Ridge

Despite the terrible price in casualties,battle marked first time Canadians fought as independent force

Editor: April 9 marks the 95th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.  After failed attempts by both British and French forces, a corps of brave and determined Canadian soldiers captured this strategic ridge in France, which was of great importance to the German defence.

Despite the terrible price in casualties, this battle marked not only a significant Allied victory, but also the first time Canadians had fought as an independent force, and not as part of the British Army.

Along with other achievements during the First World War, the Battle of Vimy Ridge helped establish Canada as a key player on the world stage, earning our country a separate signature on the Versailles Peace Treaty which ended the war.

As a member of The War Amps Operation Legacy, a group of committed young people who are dedicated to preserving Canada’s military heritage, I would like to highlight this significant anniversary of a battle considered by many to mark Canada’s birth as a nation.

To commemorate the anniversary, members of Operation Legacy will be donating copies of the documentaries A Vimy Veteran Remembers and In Flanders Field s to their local libraries.

These productions are part of The War Amps internationally award-winning Military Heritage Series, which tells the lesser-known Canadian stories, and are available at a cost-recovery price by calling 1 800 250-3030 or visiting waramps.ca.

Courtney McLaughlin, 17,

Operation Legacy Member, Quesnel

 

In memory of Uncle Stan

Editor: In March, 2011 I found out about my great uncle Stanley, who died very young at Vimy Ridge.

I wrote this poem about him and would like honour him and all the fallen soldiers who unselfishly gave their lives.  My great uncle Stan is listed on the cenotaph at the Murrayville Cemetery and when I went to see it, I was overwhelmed with grief.

This poem flowed from my heart.

Private Stanley Tyers

July 3, 1898 – April 9, 1917

At Vimy Ridge my Great Uncle Stan fell

He willingly suffered and strode bravely into hell.

He carried a rifle as he marched straight into harm

He and his regiment, his comrades in arms.

With the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, BC Regiment

He advanced for the loss of Canada to prevent.

Until at aged 18 he met his enemy face to face

As he fought and died in that dreadful place.

He generously gave his life for all in this land

For Canada, his siblings, and his heartbroken Mom and Dad.

I imagine my uncle, prayed aloud to our Lord

Give me courage and strength to continue onward.

I believe You were present and held him close Holy One

While he slipped into eternity for his work was done.

My Great Uncle Stan at Thelis in France does lie

The picture of his headstone moves me and I cry.

But his soul dwells in heaven, not in the grave

He lives forever because of his faith and life he gave.

Alone I stand at the cenotaph, lovingly tracing your name

With tears running down my face, I am not the same.

Thank you, thank you for your sacrifice Great Uncle Stan

I am grateful for your willingness to obey God’s plan.

I solemnly promise I will never forget your fate

And I know you will be waiting for me at heaven’s gate.

Cathy Tyers Moleschi

Langley

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