GREEN BEAT: Why is the sun setting on the sedan?

Environmental columnist David Clements talks to the demise of the sedan in favour of trucks and SUVs

by David Clements/Special to the Langley Advance Times

While Canadian politicians and Canadian citizens argue about the best government plan for climate action, there are other forces at work, mostly beyond governmental control.

Unprecedented hurricanes are wreaking havoc across the globe, and climate change is implicated.

Meanwhile, another change is blowing in the wind, which will further load the earth’s atmosphere with carbon.

The sun appears to be setting on the sedan.

Smaller vehicles will not disappear completely, but are clearly being eclipsed by trucks and SUVs.

LMC Automotive tracks the U.S. automotive industry (which for the most part drives worldwide trends). It projects U.S. sales for trucks and SUVs for the year 2022 as: General Motors 84 per cent, Ford 90, and Fiat Chrysler 97. And 2022 is just around the corner.

It just takes a quick inventory of the average parking lot jammed with trucks and SUVs to see that it is already happening.

To tell this story properly I have to take you back to the 1970s.

I admit I’m old enough to remember the ’70s and the oil crisis in 1973 that drove the U.S. government to demand tighter fuel economy regulations – but get this – the regulations came down harder on cars (sedans), the vehicles of the general populace.

The automobile industry ultimately responded by re-making SUVs and trucks – the less regulated ones – to become the family vehicle of choice.

Many other forces have conspired to make these vehicles the top choice: perceptions of greater safety, versatility in towing and hauling, affordable fuel (think U.S. gas), favourable international markets, and improved fuel efficiency over time.

But can they be more fuel efficient than sedans?

New York Times reporter Hiroko Tabuchi estimates on average, no matter what you do to make them more efficient, SUVs will always be 30 per cent less efficient than smaller cars.

The figure makes sense if you use something like 30 per cent more metal in the construction, it will make for heavier vehicles, with increased wind resistance and so forth.

So if you want to buck the trend and buy a car that is not an SUV or a truck, do it quickly before the sun sets on the sedan.

– David Clements PhD, is a professor of biology and environmental studies at Trinity Western University

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce to hold series of COVID-related webinars

Tourism updates, Canada Emergency Response Benefit details, and public speaking workshops expected

Langley seniors centre offers foot care and tax help but no recreation

The seniors facility has announced a partial reopening with limited services

17-year-old Langley resident Dylan Patterson earns free Chevy Malibu

Integra Tire owner Peter Foreman held an essay contest to determine a fitting recipient for the car

Langley vigil demands justice for Ontario animal activist killed protesting in front of slaughterhouse

More than two dozen people gathered at Britco Pork to remember Regan Russell, and fight Bill 156

Residential real estate market rebounding well: long-time realtor

House prices, sales, and listings in Langley are moving on an upward trajectory

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

Most Read