Langley Memorial Hospital showing signs of dementia

Hospital is reluctant to admit that mistakes are made, and ignores concerns raised.

Editor: Re: “Grand old lady has turned 65.” (letter, The Times, July 18).

It was with some interest that I read this letter. I did agree with much of it, as my experience of Langley Memorial Hospital over the decades had been positive.

However, the writer’s statement “But she remains as dependable and as effective as she always has been” does need to be challenged. My recent experience with LMH suggests to me that the grand old lady is showing serious signs of dementia, including loss of memory, neglect and disregard.

About a year ago my neighbour, age 81, suffering from congestive heart failure and failing badly, was taken to the ER. He was admitted to the grand old lady as a patient, given a superficial assessment, and two days later sent home by taxi without any determination made that the home situation was adequate to deal with his condition. He died five hours later.

A letter of complaint to the hospital administrator was forwarded to the regional district quality care division for investigation. Three months later a response was sent, which in my assessment was shallow and trivialized the event. The hospital administrator never bothered to even respond.

When I spoke to others in the community about all of this, I was told of other similar and parallel experiences they had. I do not know how dementia is treated, but I do know that neglect and disregard in practise can be addressed.

In celebrating 65 years of service to this community, the “grand old lady” needs to upgrade its standards of care, especially to the elderly, and ensure that we as a community can fully agree that she remains “as dependable and effective as always.”

Walter Schmidt,

Langley