Letter: Langley couple says social stigma and lack of funds hinder mental health

Not dealing with mental health means spending extra on the court system, two letter writers argue.

Dear Editor,

Individual and societal ignorance about severe anxiety and mental health issues continues to thrive. It is even evident in the local public school system and youth sports programs. This is often reflected in mistreatment, judgment, and bias that is otherwise deemed unacceptable when directed towards a person with any other type of disability.

The recent incident involving a university professor in Ontario openly mocking a student with self-expressed severe anxiety is but one case in point. His fellow students deserve kudos for standing up for him and for calling out the professor for offensive remarks. More pointedly, a standing ovation for the student for meeting the challenges presented by his mental health issue and for showing the guts to get to school and further his education. He deserves as much praise as any individual who overcomes and confronts a physical ailment, disability, or disease.

Stopgap measures, slap-dash spending on incongruent programs, general lip service, and cutbacks in other areas contradict any notion of an actual system of mental health care in Canada. Society would be healthier and better off financially if it proactively invested in coherent and coordinated mental health care programs focused on prevention, treatment, and support.

Instead, society persists with massive monetary and human resource outlays at the back end comprised of the criminal justice system. This is purely reactionary, merely masks problems, and ultimately this archaic approach perpetuates the same mental health afflictions. This, our fellow citizens, is the definition of real insanity, repeatedly doing the same things and expecting different results.

Governments and society ignore and avoid mental health issues at their own peril.

Tim and Lori Opper, Langley

Just Posted

Budget cuts at Kwantlen Polytechnic will mean larger classes

President of Kwantlen faculty association says administration salaries are going up

Fraser Valley Thunderbirds take silver in finals of new minor midget hockey league

Team of mostly Langley players will have a new look in the second season

Langley tutor lauded on ice

Sylvia Lloyd was recognized for the work she does – paid and unpaid – helping tutor children.

Trappers on brink of elimination after third loss

“We’ve got to play desperate hockey’ coach of Langley hockey team says

Five highlights in the 2019 federal budget

Latest budget includes a sprinkling of money for voters across a wide spectrum

Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination

The company is also paying about $5 million to cover plaintiffs’ legal fees and other costs

B.C. mosque part of open-house effort launched in wake of New Zealand shootings

The ‘Visit a Mosque’ campaign aims to combat Islamophobia

Teacher reprimanded after incident with Grade 11 student in school gym

Gregory Norman Brock was teaching at a high school in the Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows School District

Explosives unit brought in after suspicious boxes left at B.C. RCMP detachment

Nanaimo RCMP issues all clear after packages were found on lawn earlier in the day

Avalanche control tomorrow on Highway 1

Expect closures of up to two hours east of Revelstoke

Newfoundland man caught after posting photo of himself drinking and driving

The 19-year-old took a photo of himself holding a beer bottle and cigarette while at the wheel

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Carfentanil found in 15% of overdose deaths in January: B.C. coroner

Carfentanil is 100 times more powerful than illicit fentanyl and used to tranquilize elephants

Most Read