Canada’s flag. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

Canada’s flag. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)

Our View: Happy DIY Canada Day!

It’s going to be a home-based celebration for most of us

You can always barbecue.

It’s fast become a cliché, but this year’s Canada Day, like Victoria Day and spring break, and probably every holiday from now until Vaccine Day (whenever that comes) will be a little different.

No big public celebrations, unless you count the online events offered by Langley Township. No citizenship ceremony in Fort Langley, no facepainting in the parks, no bouncy castles and outdoor concerts.

Fortunately, we are far enough along in our re-opening that you can picnic, and meet up with some family and close friends (as long as you keep that social bubble relatively small).

So, this will be a do-it-yourself sort of Canada Day.

Those so inclined can raise a red-and-white flag and take part in the online events. You can put together a playlist of Canadian singers and songwriters – this country has a breadth of talent running from Alannis Morissette to Drake to Ben Heppner. You can make poutine – or get take out, if you don’t feel like filling your kitchen with the smell of cooking oil on a hot summer’s day.

And you can always have a barbecue.

Food and family seem like a pretty perfect way to enjoy any holiday.

When we’re going through tough times, we still deserve to celebrate with the ones we love. And fortunately, there’s no activity more thoroughly endorsed by our health authorities than staying close to home, making a meal with those closest to us, and enjoying it outdoors – B.C. weather permitting, of course.

So if you’re toasting the nation’s birthday this July 1, whether with domestic wine or beer, water, or properly sugary iced tea, remember that we’re all in this together, celebrating at the same time until we can gather again.

– M.C.

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