Van Dongen toxic to Conservatives

John Van Dongen appears to have trouble working and getting along with others. He has maneuvered himself into his own lonely party of one.

Editor: John Van Dongen was toxic among the 71 per cent of Conservatives who are John Cummins supporters.

At Friday evening’s BC Conservative meet-and-greet social session in Langley, approximately 150 people attended the prelude to the annual general meeting, held on Saturday.

Van Dongen was thought to have participated with a turncoat group known as ‘Friends of the BC Conservative Party’ to oust party leader Cummins. Maybe he had grandiose plans of taking over the party and becoming leader.

At the Friday event, Van Dongen stood around by himself, looking about as comfortable as a rattlesnake in a rodeo. It was obvious that he was being rejected and would have to invite himself right back out of the Conservative Party.

He wasted no time, as the very next day he announced his departure. But he didn’t leave graciously, as he attacked Cummins’ character.

Somehow,Van Dongen appears to have trouble working and getting along with others and has maneuvered himself into his own lonely party of one.

On Saturday, vote results showed 71 per cent of the members supported Cummins as their leader. Cummins is no rookie, has a strong sense of integrity and will weed out the opportunistic malcontents that arise when you are trying to build a new party. He learned and has experience from the old Reform Party days.

He knows that you can’t build a credible party with the same old faults and built in corruption as the Liberals and NDP. The new Conservatives have to be clean, honest and transparent to be a better choice.

One of his goals if elected government is to eliminate corporate and union political donations to stifle corruption, (similar to the federal system). This is highly ethical, but no question it’s a lot more difficult to compete by raising campaign money only from individuals. The Liberals and NDP would fight it tooth and nail.

Roland Seguin,

Langley

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