Journey Parkour members bounce and leap against obstacles as part of Langley’s newest sporting club. (Jessie Simpson/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Run, jump, swing, and crawl!

Parkour fever hits Langley City with addition of country’s largest course

Whether people have heard the word or not, parkour is a sport growing in popularity all over the world. Even Langley has caught parkour fever; the City is home to the largest course in Canada – constructed in 2017 at Penzer Park.

Now, Langley City has joined forces with Journey Parkour to show both kids and adults what the sport is all about.

“Parkour is about creating challenges throughout our environment using a common vocabulary of movement that is meant to be an effective way to get over your obstacles,” said Journey Parkour co-founder and director Jessie Simpson. “That includes movements such as jumping, vaulting, running, crawling, swinging, rolling, landing, and more.”

The sport makes use of various physical obstacles such as wood planks, beams, walls that participants must overcome through differing courses.

Though the sport has been recognized and enjoyed since 1988, parkour has seen its most traction in the past 10 years – particularly in the Pacific Northwest, Simpson said. “Parkour allows you to feel accomplished and physically capable,” she explained.

“So many people say ‘there’s no way I could ever do that.’ Surprisingly after a couple classes those same people say ‘I can’t believe I just did that!’ It’s pretty exciting to see our students evolve and feel great about themselves.”

Journey Parkour has been growing in size and popularity in the past two years after Seattle’s Parkour Visions and Marathon Athletics constructed the Penzer course.

Kim Hilton, director of recreation, culture, and community said the opportunity to try parkour is offered year round through Langley City. “Parkour lessons are indoors during winter months and moved out to Penzer Park in the summer,” Hilton explained. “It gives Langley a different outlet and variety for sports.”

Started by Simpson, David Baxter, and Niklas Pisko-Dubienski, Journey is currently Langley’s only parkour-centric company. Langley Cheer and Athletics and Flip City Gym additionally offer the sport, but alongside gymnastics and tumbling curriculum’s.

“I started 11 years ago by just trying it with a friend,” she said. “Seattle’s community has inspired me the most. It’s actually where I found my husband. He’s also a longtime parkour guy.”

Journey Parkour travels across the Lower Mainland and teaches in Surrey, Port Moody, North Vancouver, and Coquitlam. Their classes and introductory camps are open to children six and up.

“We start with basic foundation movement skills that are safe and step by step. We believe in functional low impact teachings for those who are thinking about preserving the body while being active,” Simpson said.

Anyone interested in learning more about the sport can stop by the park – in the 19900 of 47 A Avenue – or visit www.journeyparkour.ca.

Read more: Largest outdoor Parkour park in Canada opens in Langley

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Email: ryan.uytdewilligen@langleyadvancetimes.com

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Journey Parkour members jump and leap over obstacles at Penzer Park. (Jessie Simpson/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Journey Parkour members get to move over obstacles as Langley’s newest sporting club for all ages. (Jessie Simpson/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Journey Parkour members crawl and balance over obstacles as part of Langley’s newest sporting club. (Jessie Simpson/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

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