Salmon

A landslide beside the Ecstall River, near the old town site of Port Essington, was first seen during an overflight on Sept. 12. Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) do not know the exact date the landslide occurred. (Photo: SkeenaWild Conservation Trust/Facebook)

Landslide in northwestern B.C. threatens up to 100,000 spawning salmon

The Ecstall River is an important spawning ground for coho, chum and chinook salmon

 

Sockeye salmon carcasses are shown discarded along the shores of the Fraser River in B.C. in this undated handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Rodney Hsu

Poaching fears as Fraser River salmon are dumped to rot, even as returns slump

DFO says it needs buyers to do their part to stop black-market sales

 

The annual Kwantlen First Nation First Salmon Ceremony opens fishing in the spring. A new festival on KFN’s reserve on McMillan Island on Oct. 1 will mark the fall harvest and the end of the season. (KFN/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Salmon and Cranberry Festival comes to McMillan Island

Kwantlen First Nation launches new event with food, entertainment

 

B.C. Wildlife Federation emailed this photo of rotting sockeye salmon to news outlets on Thursday, Sept. 8. (Submitted photo)

Rotting sockeye salmon dumped along Fraser River signals ‘rampant’ illegal sales

B.C. Wildlife Federation says the dumping involves thousands, possibly tens of thousands of fish

B.C. Wildlife Federation emailed this photo of rotting sockeye salmon to news outlets on Thursday, Sept. 8. (Submitted photo)
Spawning sockeye salmon are seen making their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. on Oct. 14, 2014. Optimism over an expected bumper season for wild British Columbia sockeye salmon has turned to distress, after a regulatory body’s estimate of returns to the Fraser River dropped by nearly half this week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Concern for B.C. sockeye salmon as Fraser River return estimates drop by millions

Pre-season estimate of 9.8 million returning fish down to 5.5 million

Spawning sockeye salmon are seen making their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. on Oct. 14, 2014. Optimism over an expected bumper season for wild British Columbia sockeye salmon has turned to distress, after a regulatory body’s estimate of returns to the Fraser River dropped by nearly half this week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Medicinal plants used by members of the Yakama Nation grow near the Klickitat River, a tributary of the Columbia River, on Sunday, June 19, 2022, in Lyle, Wash. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)

Columbia River salmon are at the core of ancient religion

Pollution and climate change threatening river’s health, Indigenous spiritual traditions

Medicinal plants used by members of the Yakama Nation grow near the Klickitat River, a tributary of the Columbia River, on Sunday, June 19, 2022, in Lyle, Wash. (AP Photo/Jessie Wardarski)
DFO were aware in November that Trans Mountain work in the Coquihalla River would permanently alter salmon and trout spawning grounds. (Submitted photo)

Trans Mountain construction was green-lit with permit, despite early salmon run near Hope

Advocacy group Protect the Planet discovered and raised the alarm about the dead salmon near Hope

DFO were aware in November that Trans Mountain work in the Coquihalla River would permanently alter salmon and trout spawning grounds. (Submitted photo)
An unidentified man worried about the salmon run in the Coquihalla River confronts TMX workers (kaska_cat/Tiktok)

Man worried about nearby fish confronts Trans Mountain construction workers at Coquihalla River

Tiktok shows unidentified man confronting Trans Mountain workers over salmon run in Hope, B.C.

An unidentified man worried about the salmon run in the Coquihalla River confronts TMX workers (kaska_cat/Tiktok)
Kris Dudoward is shown aboard the commercial fishing vessel Irenda earlier this week with catch of sockeye salmon on B.C.’s Skeena River near Prince Rupert. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mitch Dudoward

Commercial fishers and wild salmon advocates cheer large returns to B.C. waters

Sockeye populations returning to a number of areas in British Columbia better than forecast

Kris Dudoward is shown aboard the commercial fishing vessel Irenda earlier this week with catch of sockeye salmon on B.C.’s Skeena River near Prince Rupert. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mitch Dudoward
A critical part of Campbell River Estuary restoration is the planting of native species like sedge grass to prevent erosion. (Binny Paul, Campbell River Mirror)

B.C. estuary a showcase for the reclamation of ruined habitat

Sterile former industrial wasteland in Campbell River e being restored as prime fish habitat

A critical part of Campbell River Estuary restoration is the planting of native species like sedge grass to prevent erosion. (Binny Paul, Campbell River Mirror)
A bucket brigade on the Spokane River is releasing tagged salmon into the Columbia River system. (Lake Roosevelt Forum/Facebook

Spring salmon spotted for 1st time since 1930 in B.C.’s Columbia River

U.S. efforts to return salmon to Upper Columbia River gaining traction, some caught in BC waters

A bucket brigade on the Spokane River is releasing tagged salmon into the Columbia River system. (Lake Roosevelt Forum/Facebook
Chum salmon at the end of their life cycle in Fish Creek. (Andrea Reid photo)

B.C. salmon abundance ‘a sixth’ of what it was half-a-century ago: study

48 Indigenous knowledge keepers from 18 Nations spoke to UBC researchers about the decline in salmon

Chum salmon at the end of their life cycle in Fish Creek. (Andrea Reid photo)
All agencies were seeking answers to the blockage caused by a landslide at Big Bar in 2019. (Incident Command Post)

Research team looking to prevent another Big Bar type landslide that could wipe out B.C. salmon

‘Goal is to determine where next landslide (to) threaten salmon is going to happen:’ SFU researcher

All agencies were seeking answers to the blockage caused by a landslide at Big Bar in 2019. (Incident Command Post)
Elenor, 4, from Murrayville, released Chinook smelts into the Nicomekl River system on Saturday, April 30. She was one of about 600 people who turned out for the Langley hatchery’s first in-person open house since the pandemic hit. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

VIDEO: Nicomekl hatchery open house called a ‘tremendous success’

Saturday fish release event drew 600 to Langley facility

Elenor, 4, from Murrayville, released Chinook smelts into the Nicomekl River system on Saturday, April 30. She was one of about 600 people who turned out for the Langley hatchery’s first in-person open house since the pandemic hit. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
Nicomekl Enhancement Society volunteer Brian Armstrong stood over salmon fry at the society hatchery in Langley. The hatchery is hosting its annual open house and fish release in two years on Saturday, April 30. (Langley Advance Times file)
Nicomekl Enhancement Society volunteer Brian Armstrong stood over salmon fry at the society hatchery in Langley. The hatchery is hosting its annual open house and fish release in two years on Saturday, April 30. (Langley Advance Times file)
Rainbow trout infected with whirling disease which damages the backbone of the fish causing them to swim in a “whirling” pattern. (Photo: Sascha Hallett, fishpathogens.net)

Concerns raised about possibility of invasive fish disease in B.C. waters

Whirling disease has decreased fish populations by 90 per cent in certain regions

Rainbow trout infected with whirling disease which damages the backbone of the fish causing them to swim in a “whirling” pattern. (Photo: Sascha Hallett, fishpathogens.net)
Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**

B.C. conservation group moves thousands of salmon that will produce millions of eggs

Human-propelled salmon run, carrying thousands of spawning salmon from a fish trap in the Salish Sea

Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**
Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**

B.C. conservation group moves thousands of salmon that will produce millions of eggs

Human-propelled salmon run, carrying thousands of spawning salmon from a fish trap in the Salish Sea

Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**
Canadian research vessel Sir John Franklin returned to Victoria after a month in the Pacific Ocean. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)

Science team returns from winter expedition with boatful of new info on Pacific salmon

Researchers studying impact of changing climate on decreasing salmon population

Canadian research vessel Sir John Franklin returned to Victoria after a month in the Pacific Ocean. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)
Spawning sockeye salmon make their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014. A coalition of Canadian groups wants Alaska's governor to halt that state's harvest of Canadian-bound salmon, and the groups are also criticizing the international treaty that prevents overfishing of Pacific salmon stocks.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Groups criticize Pacific salmon treaty, urge Alaska to protect B.C.-bound salmon

Report says only 110,000 sockeye were commercially harvested in all of B.C. in 2021

Spawning sockeye salmon make their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014. A coalition of Canadian groups wants Alaska's governor to halt that state's harvest of Canadian-bound salmon, and the groups are also criticizing the international treaty that prevents overfishing of Pacific salmon stocks.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
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