City recognized once again for Brownfield redevelopment strategy

Federation of Canadian Municipalities singled out City of Langley through its 2015 Sustainable Community Awards

A map provided by the City of Langley highlights the areas singled out for revitalization as part of its Brownfield strategy. The plan has earned the City accolades from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.

A map provided by the City of Langley highlights the areas singled out for revitalization as part of its Brownfield strategy. The plan has earned the City accolades from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities.

The City of Langley is once again being recognized for its work in brownfield redevelopment.

On Nov. 17, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) announced the winners of its 2015 Sustainable Communities Awards, recognizing innovation and excellence in municipal sustainable development in six categories: brownfields, energy, neighbourhood development, transportation, waste and water.

The City of Langley was singled out for the ambitious plans outlined in its Brownfield Redevelopment Strategy — a document it introduced in December, 2012.

Brownfields are defined as “abandoned, vacant, derelict or underutilized commercial or industrial properties, where past actions have resulted in actual or perceived contamination, and where there is an active potential for redevelopment.”

Property in the City which is deemed most appropriate for brownfield development  lies north of Fraser Highway, between Glover Road and 200 Street — particularly in the light industrial area along Logan Avenue.

By redeveloping such properties, the City hopes to improve its overall appearance and raise its tax base.

The City has previously been recognized for its brownfield strategy by the Canadian Urban Institute, which awarded the municipality a “Brownie” award in October, 2013, and again last June, when it received a BC Economic Development Community Project Award.

“Together, this year’s winning communities stand out as leading examples of how citizens, stakeholders and municipal councils can work together on a range of sustainability initiatives,” said Brad Woodside, FCM President and Mayor of City of Fredericton, N.B.

“It’s one thing to have a vision for a sustainable project — it’s quite another to engage citizens, stakeholders and council in making it a reality. As FCM president, I have been across this country and met municipal officials and citizens from the smallest towns to the largest cities, from remote northern areas, to rural coastal villages, to bustling urban centres. These award-winning projects are inspiring for all community leaders, and they demonstrate that municipalities are on the frontlines in facing environmental challenges.”

The City is among nine winners and one honourable mention that will be formally recognized at a special ceremony and in workshops planned for the FCM Sustainable Communities Conference (SCC), taking place Feb. 10 to 12 in Ontario. They will also be showcased over the coming months through case studies, videos, and as part of FCM’s free webinars.

“Through its Awards program, the SCC, and Green Municipal Fund program activities, FCM offers valuable resources to help communities build local capacity to invest in sustainable infrastructure,” said Raymond Louie, Chair of the Green Municipal Fund Council and Councillor for the City of Vancouver, BC. “I encourage elected municipal officials and municipal staff, as well as their private-sector partners and other collaborators to come to the SCC, meet the award winners in person and learn from them directly.”

A complete list of  2015 FCM Sustainable Communities Awards winners can be found online at langleytimes.com.