Sarah Jones is executive director at Langley Animal Protection Society. (Langley Advance Times file)

Sarah Jones is executive director at Langley Animal Protection Society. (Langley Advance Times file)

Free pet microchipping event in Langley fully booked

Local animal welfare society helping low-income households make sure pets can be identified

All 40 spots for Langley Animal Protection Society’s free pet microchipping event are now booked. However, the society is adding people to a wait list.

“The staff will have a productive day,” commented Sarah Jones, executive director of the local animal welfare society, as the non-profit received an “incredible” response from the community for their next event on Saturday, April 2 at 10 a.m.

The events help low income families have permanent identification for their pets. The need was apparent after a large number of misplaced animals were admitted to the local society during the recent floods.

“Microchipping is considered as a luxury and hence, they [low income pet owners] are the most vulnerable ones,” said Jones.

Jones, concerned about the pets in and around the community, wants to make sure that owners can find their pets if natural disasters happen again in the future.

“We want to keep families together… that is our goal,” she said.

Many animals rescued during the flood were not able to be reunited as they did not have proper identification, and Jones said that owners may not have known where to look for their lost friends.

Microchipping pets helps shelters and vets track owners of misplaced animals. The planted chips can be scanned 24 hours a day, giving them an added advantage over tattoos and licences which need shelters and vets to contact offices for details.

As tiny as a grain of rice, the chips are planted through an injection near the shoulder blades of an animal. A chip can stay in the body throughout the lifespan of a furry friend.

Veterinarians from Brookswood Veterinary Hospital and Mountainview Veterinary Hospital will be present at the location to plant the microchips and address any concerns of the pet owners.

Those attending will also get a sticker on which they write the number of animals living in their house. The idea, Jones said, will help emergency responders so they know how many animals to search for in an emergency situation such as a house fire. In addition, Langley Animal Protection Society staff will had out a checklist sheet to help people determine the items they would need in their emergency grab-and-go packs.

“The most important thing with natural disaster is to be prepared,” Jones said. “You need medications, extra food, and other stuff you need for yourself and your pets.”

Since there is a wait list for the microchipping, Jones said they might be able to do another similar event in the near future. For more information, people can visit the LAPS website, www.lapsbc.ca/. The society is located at 26220 56th Ave.

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As tiny as a grain of rice, microchips are implanted through an injection near the shoulder blades of an animal. Chips help hospitals and animal shelter staff reunite animals with their owners. (Langley Advance Times file)

As tiny as a grain of rice, microchips are implanted through an injection near the shoulder blades of an animal. Chips help hospitals and animal shelter staff reunite animals with their owners. (Langley Advance Times file)

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