Looking Back: December 7, 2017

Looking Back: December 7, 2017

Our community’s history as recorded in the pages of the Langley Advance.

Eighty Years Ago

December 2, 1937

Langley Agricultural Association voted 23-17 in favour of amalgamating with Delta and Surrey to put on a Class B agricultural fair in Cloverdale.

Council protested the actions of the Soldier Settlement Board which placed “near destitute” cases on their Langley holdings.

Seventy Years Ago

December 4, 1947

Reeve (mayor) Noel Booth announced he would stand fro re-election. He would face sitting councillor Eric Flowerdew and Ratepayers Association candidate Tom Reid. Booth had served one year in 1934. In 1946 he defeated Flowerdew and Mrs. D.G. Rogers for the position, and won the 1947 term by acclamation.

Bill Poppy stood as the Ratepayers’ councillor candidate for Ward Six.

Sixty Years Ago

November 28, 1957

Staff tried to accommodate 57 patients in the 51-bed Langley Memorial Hospital. Two patients slept on stretchers, two on tables, one in a make-shift bed, and another, a maternity patient, was on a mattresws on the floor.

A severe storm cut electric service for 5½ hours. In Glen Valley, a twister broke a window of a house at the corner of Jackman Road (272nd Street) and Graham Road, and picked up a machinery shed on Dan McLellan’s farm, depositing it upside down in a drainage slough.

Fifty Years Ago

November 30, 1967

An executive slate and 17 aldermen were elected at a Langley Teen Town meeting. Bob Beadle was mayor, with Norman Wilson as vice-mayor, Kevin Cox treasurer, and Joanne Wenman secretary. Social conveners for 1968 were to be Fran Howie and retiring mayor Sandy Chamberlayne.

Nineteen candidates were signed up to contest nine vacancies in the upcoming City and Township civic elections.

Forty Years Ago

November 30, 1977

A 24-year-old Langley man was remanded in custody after being charged in the stabbing of another Langley man, David Grafstrom, who had died after an incident outside the Langley Hotel a week earlier.

The retirement of Fred Greer left the Otter Farmers Institute’s general management not in the hands of a Greer family member for the first time in its history.

Thirty Years Ago

December 2, 1987

Langley mayors John Beales and Reg Easigwood were to get together to discuss the building of a new headquarters for the local RCMP detachment.

Former Langley school board vice-chair Donna Rantamaa landed a job as Langley School District’s community relations facilitator.

Langley teachers voted overwhelmingly in favour of the Langley Teachers’ Association becoming a trade union.

Twenty Years Ago

November 28, 1997

The 17-year-old who had mowed down a group of teens in Stokes Pit in his car in September pleaded guilty to charges of dangerous driving causing death and bodily harm. Two youngsters, Ashley Reber and Heidi Klompas, died as a result of the incident.

Sod was turned to start construction on a new elementary school in Walnut Grove on 91A Avenue.

Truus Birza of Aldergrove and Linda Morgan of Langley were appointed to the South Fraser Regional Health Board. The sole previous local representative, Kim Richter, had retired from her post in May, in hopes that Ed Vanderboom, the elected chair of the Langley Memorial Hospital board which had been disbanded after the regional body was created, would be appointed in her place.

Local heritage buffs voiced approval for the plan to restore the historic Traveller’s Hotel in Murrayville. Some concern was expressed by others, however, over the “generous” lease agreement which gave the restorers a $5/year lease for 99 years.

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