Artists impression of the Village Memory Care Project in Langley. Supplied

Langley dementia village cost per patient estimated at $70,000 to $90,000 annually

Builders don’t plan to approach Fraser Health about subsidies until the project is complete

A Langley project that will provide a village-like atmosphere and intensive support for people with dementia could cost as much as $90,000 a year for some patients.

The estimate was provided in a recent email newsletter to people interested in the Village memory care project, which said the amount will vary depending on “the type and level of support required.”

“Prices are projected to start at $195 per day ($5,900/month) and go up to $245 per day ($7,550/month),” the newsletter stated.

“We are hoping to secure some form of subsidy from Fraser Health but that is a work in progress.”

There is a list for people interested in subsidized spaces, the newsletter added.

“We’ve had a lot of people signing up (on the subsidy list),” Village marketing and community engagement manager Guy Thorburn told the Times.

Thorburn said the builders don’t plan to approach the regional health authority about possible subsidies until construction is finished.

“We’re not going to be pursuing the subsidies with Fraser Health until the project is up and built,” Thorburn said.

“And the reason for that is that we don’t want the design, and the look and feel of the village, compromised by government design regulations. Although we’re designing it to (the highest standards) we just don’t, at this stage, want to be working with Fraser Health on design.”

Thorburn said the costs quoted in the newsletter were “early estimates.”

“Of course, until construction finishes, we don’t know what the final price tag is … but they shouldn’t go any higher than that,” Thorburn said.

In B.C, subsidized long-term residential care is based on a percentage of income and costs up to a maximum of $3,278.80 a month, or about $39,000 a year, as of 2018.

However, as noted by the Fraser Health website, the subsidized fee may not cover many things, including telephone, television cable or internet charges, some types of medication, special outings or social events, health equipment like wheelchairs with unique features, or walkers.

Construction of The Village memory care project on 6.96 acres at the former Bradshaw Elementary site is underway in Brookswood at 3920 198 St. and is expected to be completed by spring 2019.

READ MORE: VIDEO: The Village ‘first private memory care community of its kind in Western Canada’

It is similar to the Hogewey project in the Netherlands, where 152 seniors with dementia live in a specially designed village with 23 houses. The complex includes squares, gardens and a park where the residents can safely roam, along with a grocery store, restaurant, bar and theatre streets.

The Langley complex will consist of six single-storey craftsman style cottages with one main, two-storey community building where up to 76 people with dementia can live in a village setting complete with cottages, shops, a café, a farm, a salon, fish and duck pond, crafting and art spaces, and a community centre.

Staffed by 72 employees, The Village will also include a gated entry, eight-foot perimeter fence with a resident location monitoring system, a 24/7 caretaker, and staff on site at all times.

READ MORE: The Village community for dementia patients about to take shape

At the groundbreaking ceremony for the project in February, B.C. seniors advocate Isobel Mackenzie said The Village will complement existing B.C. care facilities that treat people with dementia and other related cognitive challenges.

“As we continue to age and increase the number of people who are going to need some supports, I think that it’s important that the supply keeps up with the demand,” Mackenzie said.

“I think it’s very helpful that this development has come along at the time that it has and in the location that it has.”

The office of the Seniors Advocate monitors and analyzes seniors’ services and issues in B.C., and makes recommendations to government and service providers to address systemic issues.

Eighteen per cent of B.C.’s population is aged 65 and older and that number is expected to increase to roughly 25 per cent over the next 20 years.



dan.ferguson@langleytimes.com

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