Construction fencing, which is to be reconfigured in January to close the parking lot on the east side of White Rock Museum and Archives, has been in place at White Rock’s Memorial Park since September. (Tracy Holmes photo)

Memorial Park assessment to start in new year

White Rock and Semiahmoo First Nation to consult on archeological issues

The City of White Rock is to move current fencing at Memorial Park to its original place on the waterfront – shutting off the parking lot on the east side of White Rock Museum and Archives – in the second week of January while an archeological-impact assessment process for the planned park upgrade takes place.

The process itself – to be conducted by the city in continuing consultation with Semiahmoo First Nation – will begin on Jan. 2, according to city communications manager Farnaz Farrokhi.

The fencing had been moved to accommodate residents and merchants during the holiday season, Farrokhi said.

In response to questions from Peace Arch News Dec. 14, Farrokhi confirmed last week that the city had applied for a provincial archeological permit for the project on Oct. 23 – more than a month after the project was shut down by a cease-and-desist order from Semiahmoo First Nations Chief Harley Chappell and councillors Joanne and Roxanne Charles at what was supposed to be an official ground-breaking ceremony for the $6-million project.

Dec. 13, the city received a provincial archeological permit for the project – which is to include reconfiguring the park property between the museum and the pier, and upgrading the washrooms – Farrokhi added.

SFN council members said at the time they presented the cease-and-desist order that the First Nation had not been consulted during the project-design process, and that archeological protection protocols had not been observed on land that is traditional SFN territory and which may contain artifacts and burial sites of historical importance.

Farrokhi said Dec. 19 that work that week would be on “site preparation.”

“Crews will be out doing non-demo work such as setting up utility locals and lights,” she said.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Langley students mark Orange Shirt Day

Sept. 30 initiative aims to raise awareness about government-run residential schools

How Langley football star Chase Claypool was nicknamed “Mapletron”

A reference to all-time NFL great Calvin Johnson Jr.

Air quality across the Lower Mainland could worsen slightly

AQ health index could see ‘low risk’ gravitate into ‘moderate risk’ from Vancouver to Hope

Langley invited to take part in virtual National Seniors Day gathering

The Canadian Association of Retired Persons invites people to take part in an Oct. 1 event online

ELECTION: Libertarian Alex Joehl to run in Langley East

Second provincial run by Murrayville resident

Orange Shirt Society launches first textbook on residential school history

Phyllis Webstad and Joan Sorley worked on the 156-page book to help educate students

Horgan vows to replace B.C.’s shared senior care rooms in 10 years

$1.4 billion construction on top of staff raises, single-site work

Burnaby RCMP search for suspects after man racially abused, has coffee thrown on him

Police treating the incident as a hate crime and assault

Surrey police probe serious crashes, one fatal

Police want to talk to witnesses or anyone who might have dash-cam video

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

More sex abuse charges laid against B.C. man who went by ‘Doctor Ray Gaglardi’

Investigators now focussing efforts on alleged victims within the Glad Tidings Church community

Orange Shirt Day lessons of past in today’s classrooms

Phyllis Webstad, who attended St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School in British Columbia, is credited for creating the movement

Most Read