A report presented to Langley City Council says the municipality needs to build more affordable housing to meet projected demand (Langley Advance Times file)

A report presented to Langley City Council says the municipality needs to build more affordable housing to meet projected demand (Langley Advance Times file)

More townhouses, affordable housing needed in Langley City, report says

Langley City housing needs report projects increased demand

Langley City will need thousands of new, affordable residential units to accommodate expected demand by 2024, according to a consultant’s report prepared for the City.

The “Langley City Housing Needs report” by Modus Planning, Design and Engagement, was prepared in response to a 2018 change in provincial laws that require local governments to prepare reports that identify the number and type of housing units needed to meet current and anticipated needs for at least the next five years.

Over the period from 2016 to 2024, Modus forecasts the city will require a net number of 1,353 new residential units to meet projected population growth.

It calls for increased development of “townhouse and/or row house units” to help fill what is described as “a significant and crucial gap” in the current housing market.

READ ALSO: Langley City greenlights redevelopment of West Country hotel site on 56 Avenue

Langley City director of development services Carl Johannsen said the report shows single detached homes “are not attainable for most Langley City resident income groups” and the City should encourage the development of townhouses, row houses and other more affordable options, to help fill a “significant gap in Langley City’s current housing market.”

Seniors, people with disabilities or limited mobility, single parent families and young people, will require “particular attention,” which could be met through development of garden and basement suites, accessible housing units, co-ops, and rental options with more than three bedrooms,” Johannsen said.

Johannsen noted the City is already moving in that direction, with new policies that aim to encourage “missing middle” housing types.

READ ALSO: Rental vacancies in Langley lower than in Vancouver

According to the report, Langley City residents are, on average slightly older and less well-off than other Lower Mainland communities.

Approximately 19.2 per cent of residents are 65 years and over, which is several percentage points higher than the surrounding municipalities and the Metro Vancouver average.

Median income across all households is just under $60,000, lower than the Metro average of just under $73,000.

The most common household type are one-person households, 39 per cent, which is more than the 20 per cent reported in the Township of Langley and the City of Surrey, and more than the Metro average of 29 per cent.

A higher amount of Langley City households, 38 per cent, are renters, which is more than double the 17 per cent in the Township of Langley.


Is there more to the story? Email: dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

HousingLangley City

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

This year, athletes from across the province competed for top honours at the Christy Fraser Memorial Gymnastics Invitational by recording their performances on video for judges (Langley Advance Times file)
Langley’s Christy Fraser Memorial gymnastics competition goes virtual

Unable to compete in person, athletes recorded their performances for judges

Metal plaques have been pried from the base of Steve Ryan’s Langley City statues, “The Traders,” seen on Sunday, Feb. 28, at Innes Corners plaza (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
Metal plaques pried from base of historic statues in Langley City

“The Traders,” who stand facing each other on Innes Corners plaza, was among the targeted sculptures

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday December 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C.’s compromise on in-person worship at three churches called ‘absolutely unacceptable’

Would allow outdoor services of 25 or less by Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack churches

Aldergrove Credit Union's Willoughby branch opens March 9. (Ryan Uytdewilligen/Special to The Star)
Aldergrove Credit Union puts finishing touches on new Willoughby location

Branch’s soft opening to be held Tuesday, March 9, grand opening on March 27

Charlie Fox was leading as of 9 p.m. with five of six main polls and one advance poll reporting. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)
UPDATED: Fox expected to become new Langley school trustee

With all but the mail-in ballots counted, Fox was being acknowledged as the winner

A health worker holds a vial of AstraZeneca vaccine to be administered to members of the police at a COVID-19 vaccination center in Mainz, Germany, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021. The federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate, start with the vaccination of police officers in internal police vaccination centers. (Andreas Arnold/dpa via AP)
B.C. officials to unveil new details of COVID vaccination plan Monday

Seniors and health-care workers who haven’t gotten their shot are next on the list

An investigation is underway after a man was shot and killed by Tofino RCMP in Opitsaht. (Black Press Media file photo)
Man shot and killed by RCMP near Tofino, police watchdog investigating

Investigation underway by Independent Investigations Office of British Columbia.

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday December 11, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C.’s compromise on in-person worship at three churches called ‘absolutely unacceptable’

Would allow outdoor services of 25 or less by Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack churches

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Baldy Mountain Resort was shut down on Saturday after a fatal workplace accident. (Baldy Mountain picture)
Alina Durham, mother of Shaelene Bell, lights candles on behalf of Bell’s two sons during a vigil on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO and PHOTOS: Candlelight vigil for missing Chilliwack woman sends message of hope

Small group of family, friends gathered to shine light for 23-year-old mother Shaelene Bell

Jasmine and Gwen Donaldson are part of the CAT team working to reduce stigma for marginalized groups in Campbell River. Photo by Marc Kitteringham, Campbell River Mirror
Jasmine’s story: Stigma can be the hardest hurdle for those overcoming addiction

Recovering B.C. addict says welcome, connection and community key for rebuilding after drug habit

A Vancouver restaurant owner was found guilty of violating B.C.’s Human Rights Code by discriminating against customers on the basis of their race. (Pixabay)
Vancouver restaurant owner ordered to pay $4,000 to customers after racist remark

Referring to patrons as ‘you Arabs’ constitutes discrimination under B.C.’s Human Rights Code, ruling deems

Most Read