Larry, one of two pot-bellied pigs that are about to go to a new home after they were found roaming stray in Langley last year. (LAPS/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Larry, one of two pot-bellied pigs that are about to go to a new home after they were found roaming stray in Langley last year. (LAPS/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Stray pigs get gussied up for new Langley homes

Two lost pot-bellied pigs were taken in by Langley’s animal shelter

A pair of lost Langley pigs are likely off to a new life as pets after the Langley Animal Protection Society has found them a home on a hobby farm.

Pot-bellied pigs Babe and Larry are both likely going to be adopted by someone buying a new farm in Langley, said Sarah Jones, executive director of LAPS.

While LAPS mostly takes in and adopts out dogs and cats, because Langley is an agricultural community, they are also called on sometimes to help out with farm animals and pet livestock, including pigs, goats, fowl, and llamas.

In this case, they took in two pigs over the last several months.

Babe, thought to be about two years old, was found as a stray in the 23900 block of 14A Avenue on Oct. 29 last year, and was picked up by a LAPS animal control officer.

He was neutered, microchipped, and vaccinated by LAPS, as well as having his tusks and hooves trimmed, Jones said.

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Larry is believed to be around five years old, and was also picked up as a stray after a member of the public found him on their farm in the 1300 block of 235th Street.

He went through the same procedures as Babe, including getting his shots and having his tusks and hooves trimmed.

“He is a character and can jump two-foot fences for food!” said Jones.

While Babe and Larry are expected to soon be in their forever home, LAPS is always looking for more fostering sites for farm animals.

“We need to build our temporary fosters for chickens, ducks, goats, pigs, horses, etc,” Jones said. “And then we also really need adopters as well.”

Fostering means to look after an animal temporarily until a permanent adoptive home can be found.

“We pay for all supplies for our fosters, so it is really just giving them a safe place to be that is suited for their individual needs,” Jones said. “As you can imagine a shelter full of dogs and cats is not the best place for farm animals.”

Anyone who is interested in becoming a farm animal foster for LAPS can email info@lapsbc.ca, and their name will be kept on file until an animal in need comes to the shelter.

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Have a story tip? Email: matthew.claxton@langleyadvancetimes.com

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