Summer Games books show surplus

  • Jan. 20, 2011 12:00 p.m.

Last July, thousands of athletes, officials, and visitors converged in the Township for the B.C. Summer Games, and a financial review shows that the efforts of volunteers, organizations, and contributors made the massive event a success.

Fiscal year-end financial statements show the Games came in under budget, with a net income of $136,823.

“We need to commend the entire Township of Langley BC Summer Games Society board of directors for delivering extraordinary Games within the budget that had been developed and approved,” said the Township’s director of recreation, culture, and parks David Leavers. “Efforts to secure considerable cash and in-kind contributions, skilled financial management, and overall leadership all resulted in Games that maximized the experience with available funds.”

Total revenues generated for the Games came in at $824,304. Expenditures totaled $670,006, and after paying out $17,475 in additional designated expenses, almost $137,000 remained.

To help stage the Games, $600,000 was contributed by the province, and the Township provided a $45,000 cash grant. More than $32,000 was received from Langley Spirit of BC when it dissolved, and $148,454 was donated by businesses and individuals as “Friends of the Games.”

The Summer Games had a significant economic impact on the community. Although an economic impact assessment of the 2010 Games was not completed by the BC Games Society, it did calculate that the previous Games held in Kelowna in 2008 generated $1.9 million of direct spending by participants, spectators, and volunteers, including $682,000 of direct spending by Games organizers.

It has been determined that Langley’s direct spending totalled $687,899, Leavers said. It is believed the Langley Games generated in excess of $2 million in economic activity.

The surplus revenue raised by the Games will serve as a legacy for the future, and the majority will be put back into the community. By agreement, the net income from the Games will be divided between the host community (Township of Langley) and the BC Games Society (Province of British Columbia). The Township’s share of this has been determined to be $75,414.

A Township legacy committee has been formed that includes Mayor Rick Green, Kelly Mann of the BC Games Society, and Michael Jackstien and Jamey Paterson of the Township of Langley 2010 BC Summer Games Society. The committee will decide how these funds will be expended to benefit the community as a lasting legacy to the Games.

In-kind contributions – which ranged from donations of food and building supplies to advertising and the provision of lodgings – also had a positive budget impact on the Games.

“In total, the Langley community provided $490,405 in in-kind contributions to the 2010 BC Summer Games,” Leavers said. “Without these generous donations, the Games could not have been delivered within budget.”

In-kind contributions from the Township of Langley and the Langley School District were not included in the financial tally, despite the dedication of much staff time and facility fee waivers.

“School district and Township management directed internal resources to the overall Games effort to ensure the success of the event,” Leavers said. “Rental costs for schools, buses, recreation facilities, and parks were waived, yet no additional budget funds were allocated.”

He noted that staff took on the additional duties required by the Games as a priority and integrated them into their workload in the months and weeks leading up to the event.

The success of the Township’s 2010 BC Summer Games can be viewed in comparison with other recent host communities. The cash donations raised were the highest total of any Games in the past 10 years, and the in-kind contributions were the largest sum since the 2004 Abbotsford Games. This was all achieved while in the midst of an economic downturn in the year that preceded the event, and in the same year that many corporations were committed to Olympic sponsorship.

A summary of the Games’ financial statements was submitted to Township council in January.

Community groups, schools, and organizations that care for those in need or deliver important services to the community will be feeling the positive effects of the Games long after the event has ended.

The Games made a significant financial contribution to the community, and as an additional legacy, expenditures made by the Township’s Summer Games Society have been donated within the community.

More than $11,500 worth of kitchen smallwares were purchased for use during the Games, then donated to Campbell Valley House, Christian Life Assembly, Friends of Langley Vineyard, Gateway of Hope, Langley Community Services, Langley Senior’s Resource Centre, Southgate Church, Wagner Hills Farm, and Ishtar Transition Housing Society.

A new industrial dishwasher that was purchased for $7,970 will remain at Langley Secondary School, and close to $20,770 worth of sports equipment has been given to local sport organizations.

More than 32,000 meals were prepared during the massive July event, and to ensure no leftovers went to waste, unconsumed food from the Games’ food services were donated daily to both the Gateway of Hope and the Langley Food Bank, with an estimated value of $20,000.

The BC Summer Games also delivered significant non-financial legacies to the community including:

· A community celebration and community pride;

· Trained and enhanced skill development of local community volunteers; and

· Development platform for BC athletes, coaches, and officials – BC Games are the stepping stone to national and international competition and to the Canada Games and Olympic Games for many athletes, coaches, and officials.

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