Ann Bason, the mother of Aldergrove resident Master Cpl. Colin Bason who was killed in Afghanistan, Allan De Genova, the president of Honour House and Barry Drews, of the 3rd Canadian Army Veterans, admire the mock-up of the Highway of Heroes sign before it was posted along the Trans-Canada Highway in 2011.

Ann Bason, the mother of Aldergrove resident Master Cpl. Colin Bason who was killed in Afghanistan, Allan De Genova, the president of Honour House and Barry Drews, of the 3rd Canadian Army Veterans, admire the mock-up of the Highway of Heroes sign before it was posted along the Trans-Canada Highway in 2011.

Honour House backs ‘Highway of Heroes’ sign

Several organizations dedicated to assisting veterans are backing Highway of Heroes sign.

Editor: Re: “Highway of Heroes is confusing,” letters, The Times, Oct. 9).

Unfortunately, Jacob de Raadt does not have a complete understanding of the intent or reasoning in the naming of the Langley section of Highway 1.

This was so named to carry on the recognition of the sections of Highway 1 that are so named across Canada.

If one were to read the sign completely, you would note that it also carries the insignias of 3rd CAV (Canadian Army Veterans), who represent the dead, living and wounded and are based in the Chilliwack area.

The sign also carries the insignia of Honour House, which represents all first  defenders — military, police, firefighters and paramedics. This is a first in Canada. It involved no federal help.

Honour House is a home away from home for any of these people and their families to stay at no cost to them while receiving medical aid or treatment. The home is located in New Westminster.

The concept came from Allan De Genova, after meeting Capt. Trevor Greene of the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada. He was  severely   wounded in Afghanistan and was treated in various hospitals and provinces without the benefit of free accommodations for his family and fiancée. He felt that there was a need to assist and honour these people. Honour House Society was formed.

De Genova then set out to find a site,  an architect and a way to build it.

He approached the Vancouver Regional Construction Association for advice. They approached me to see if it could be built on a volunteer basis. As a retired past chairman of the association and its life members, I assured both groupsies that it could be done by donations of labour, cash and materials.

Work was started in April, 2009 and completed in October, 2011. The kindness and generosity of all members of VRCA, unions, manufacturers, suppliers and trades allowed this to happen. We were able to raise $1.4 million with a final cost of $.1 million. The balance was funded by Honour House Society through various drives and donations.

We did not do this to glorify wars, fires or accidents, but to assist and say thank  to you to  those who do the work and require the help.

Don Vandervoort

project coordinator,

VRCA-Honour House

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